Tableau by Rose Eken

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

In Copenhagen, V1 gallery is currently presenting a large-scale ceramic installation by the Danish artist Rose Eken, entitled Tableau. This work, on view through September 19, is the outcome of an extensive research based on Eken’s correspondence and dialogue conducted with other contemporary artists around the world. Tableau is the artist’s largest installation to date, comprising of hundreds of ceramic objects: brushes, buckets of paint, box cutters, clusters of books and magazines, half-finished cups of coffee, ghetto blasters, laptops, Iphones and other personal objects. Here you can find the imitation of John Copeland’s collection of vintage playboy magazines and old axe, Fryd Frydendahl’s Canon EOS D5 Camera or Wes Lang’s collection of wooden tobacco pipes.

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard


Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Miniature ceramic models are dispersed in the exhibition space, suggesting a study on the universal artistic language and clichés. By operating from real live folders in order to create her own fictional story, Eken proposes a generic model of the artist studio. The objects and their symbolism brought together in the exhibition are very different in their forms: simultaneously, whereas wine bottles and cigarette butts unfold highly sentimental ideals regarding artist atelier, a more digitalised and updated version of the artistic figure manifests itself through MacBooks and iPhones. These observations help to understand transforming identities of artist, when the traditional craftsman-like idea of the artist image makes room for more scattered practises and identities.

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard


Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

With Tableau, Eken succeeds in mimicking a set of preapproved beliefs, while proposing a gaze into artistic banalities. The ceramic compositions in the exhibition are imbued with frivolity; yet their presence in a shared space and strangely precise arrangement place them within purely subjective associations. Eken’s correspondence-based research has not been conducted in order to document, but rather to assume the significance of encounters, at many different levels. This studio “replica” proposed by Eken puts forward the idea of the artist atelier often conceived as something mystical and almost sacred place, but also, referring to the almost religious ritual of studio visits. Artist studios are understood as highly intimate and personal places, yet they’re susceptible of the gaze of the outside world.

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard


Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Courtesy of Rose Eken and V1 Gallery. Photo: Jan Soendergaard

Rose Eken was born in Denmark (1976) and graduated from the Royal College of Art in London in 2003. She received critical praise for her recent solo exhibition Remain In The Light at The Hole gallery in New York. Her first work from the “Tableau series” was acquired by ARoS museum of art in the summer of 2015. A new publication documenting the process and exhibition will be released to coincide with Tableau. Rose Eken would like to thank the following artists for inspiration and for sharing their studios: Michelle Grabner, Erwin Wurm, Søren Behncke, Joakim Ojanen, Ivan Andersen, Mikael Swaney, Richard Colman, Shane Bradford, Jonathan Meese, Eske Kath, Julie Nord, HuskMitNavn, Hartmut Stockter, Andreas Schulenburg, Kaspar Bonnén, Chloe Piene Studio, Maiken Bendt, Cecily Brown, John Copeland, Graham Dolphin, Alexander Tovborg, Morten Schelde, Michael Kvium, Wes Lang, Fryd Frydendahl, Hesselholdt & Mejlvang, Kristian Devantier, Erik Parker, Fischli & Weiss, Jackson Pollock and Joan Miró.

V1 gallery Rose Eken

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Marcin Kupinski for Barbara I Gongini

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

Designer Barbara I Gongini, is an active participant in the Nordic art discourse, working interdisciplinary in close collaboration with various artists in film, music and photography. In occasion of Copenhagen Fashion Week, together with our partners from REVS magazine, we had the chance to meet her and discover an exquisite take on Danish garments, derived from her conceptual approach towards fashion design, eloquently suitable for both men and women. In turn, her work has been featured by artisans across borders in the spirit of her collaborative nature, in a myriad of different shapes with various purposes.

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Lab, is a studio located among the industrial warehouses of Copenhagen, where The Talk and The Move took place. An exhibition presenting a display of her iconic pieces, a chance to meet Barbara I Gongini and her team, but also an excellent practice of design in motion through a performance by Marcin Kupinski, from Danish Royal Ballet. Marcin Kupinski (born 1983) is the Polish dancer who joined the Royal Danish Ballet in 2002, becoming a soloist in 2010 and a principal dancer in 2011. His roles have included Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake, James in La Sylphide, the prince in The Nutcracker, Junker Ove in A Folk Tale and the poet in La Sonnambula.

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

Entering the stage unpretentiously undressed, Kupinski opened the show in a vigorous manner. During the performance Kupinski continued taking garments from the circular textile sculpture installed on the ground, swinging clothes in the air, dancing with them, and slowly wearing them, being in the end, completely dressed in Barbara I Gongini’s mood. A cinematic and mysterious performance, a dramatic act recalling the darkness of Faroe Islands, and the designer’s obsessive and hectic world. A dark performance from which emerged a dramatic representation of life without light, a phantasmagoric dance of shapes and lines, and the omnipresent use of black color.

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

Kupinski also won various awards including the Special Jury Prize at the 2002 Varna International Ballet Competition and the Grand Prix at the Eurovision Young Dancers contest in 2001. As a guest performer, he has danced in the international company Cross Connection as well as in Rome, Lithuania and Japan. The performance in Copenhagen, took place on a concert by The Magnetic Eagle, the band that in the last two years has gained the status of being a leading impro-pop group. Since their debut in 2013, they have received overwhelming recognition for their live gigs, mixing up epic and psychedelic universe, and for creating sounds with a radical and adventurous musical approach that once again matches with Barbara I Gongini’s tones.

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

The Talk and The Move, Marcin Kupinski © The Art Markets

An Olympus Pen camera and a Ws voice recorder have been used to document this review

Barbara I Gongini

REVS Magazine

Royal Danish Theatre

 

 

Afa on the beach

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

63rd-77th Steps – Art Project Staircase – is a project space founded and run by artist Fabio Santacroce. The name refers to the final part of a multi-floor staircase (the area between the 63rd and the 77th steps) inside a building dating from the beginning of the XX century in “Quartiere Libertà”, a popular and multicultural district in Bari, Italy. The first site-specific exhibition hosted at the beginning of 2014 was by Amalia Ulman, followed by Ilja Karilampi, Renaud Jerez, Daniel Keller, Lucia Leuci, Airbnb Pavilion and the group show Always Brian (ti amo). The project space curates also online projects including the ones by Riccardo Benassi, Sol Calero, Massimo Grimaldi and Daniele Milvio.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

63rd-77th Steps – Art Project Staircase – organizes off-site projects such as the group shows Afa and the current one Afa 2, with Michael Assiff, Rosa Ciano, Liz Craft, Maja Cule, Ditte Gantriis, Uffe Isolotto, Bradford Kessler, Spencer Longo, Lucia Leuci, Pentti Monkkonen, Rolf Nowotny, Fabio Santacroce and Ilya Smirnov. Afa 2 is on view until August 12, in the evenings between 7 and 9pm at Pane & Pomodoro Beach of Corso Trieste, Bari (Italy). The artists involved produced images to be printed on microfiber towels which were installed on the beach, under the reference of a little story about the breadcrumbs’ conquest by an ant in an apartment. The story reflects a local’s neo-realistic overlook on common, graceless summer life at the seaside.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

“Bari, 20 July 2015 – Only one survived. It was not the usual lucky one but the most voracious and yet the most timid. It seemed dazed, rusty but fair. It advanced jerkily, up and down. The silence, diluted with boiling air, thundered in its dry stomach and inflated the few breadcrumbs torn away from the recently disinfected earthenware floor.
The air also bumped against the high mosquito nets, seeping painfully through the thick metallic meshes while the fat children, dressed of love and deception, were not able to catch, silently, down in the courtyard. Probably there had been no time, effort and intuition to educate them at the essentiality of the warm summer silence.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

Courtesy of the artist and 63rd-77th STEPS.

And every noise from outside sounded also as a roar in the stomach of the little ant that could contain, at most, only three crumbs of that authoritarian bread. 
This needed, in fact, to be monitored and dragged away frantically before the time when, even the asphalt became crumbly. How heavy is usually a dry breadcrumb that falls mistakenly on the ground? And potentially, in the impact, how many micro crumbs does it fractionate into? 
In any case, no one was in the apartment that afternoon, maybe they were all on the beach to roast their thick skins along with the unpunished lies. Meanwhile the fatty rice salad was earning flavor in the fridge.”

63rd-77th Steps