Julie Béna – Destiny

When visiting Julie Béna’s solo exhibition Destiny at Galerie Édouard-Manet de Gennevilliers, an absurd feeling of flatness takes over right from the beginning: the gallery has been transformed into a reminiscent of an office space, whose aesthetics is predominantly borrowed from the turn of the millennium. A carpet with geometric shapes and figures against a grey background is occupying the floor, leading the visitor to discover Béna’s introduction to corporate world, with a body of work solely conceived for the gallery space. With her exhibition Destiny, this French artist reveals to be faithful to her previous production, that is, finding inspiration from the world of theatre and popular culture, simultaneously transforming and disturbing spatial forms and codes.

This false reality, by definition a corporate one this time, starts right from the entry. As if introducing to a corporate zone, we can find a large TV screen on the wall welcoming the visitor, displaying a conversation between Miss None and Mister Peanut. An absurd exchange between the two cartoonish-like characters takes place, however, it is deprived of meaning and logic: words are pronounced and repeated, forming an attempt for a dialogue. Yet, the identities are blurred, or rather, they don’t exist.

Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.


Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.

A large office desk occupies the second room of the gallery: this is presumably the main office space. Its design – this seems to be the apt term to employ in this context – is dominated by the use of steel and glass. Respectively, sharpness and precision, even sterility are the dominating visual stimuli: the space reminds me of a perfect composition of an office decor taken afresh from a sales catalogue, one intended for enterprises. A perfect composition reigns in the space together with a cold and bright lighting guiding the vision: here you can’t find any coffee stains nor piles of papers waiting to be organised. Functionality and freshness could be suitable terms to use here, however, perhaps it is exactly for this reason that the space feels primarily flat and empty.

This lack of flavour with a certain clinical approach is further enhanced by the vinyl labels found on glass plates. Eyes are able to spell letters composing words, yet their selection seems somewhat arbitrary. This supplementary gesture allows us to contemplate on what is left for linguistic symbols when removed from their initial context. The same goes for the space’s interior design: what happens when material symbols and even entire spaces are removed from their original composition and then reselected, cut, copied and assembled in a new framework? This compositional style of Béna continues in the last room of the gallery: a plexiglass divides the space, whose starting point is indicated with a symbol of a hand glued on the floor. Once again the letters form the word destiny.

Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.


Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.

A certain internet awareness is legible in Béna’s work: her aesthetic vocabulary finds its inspiration from the world wide web, while using the components of a digital collage. Despite these multiple layers of symbols and references constructing the puzzle, much is left unsaid: entire holes and symbols of insignificance can be traced throughout the exhibition. There are parts and pieces missing, or rather, they’re unknown. The artist plays extensively with spatial and temporal conditions, disturbing and challenging them, at the same time offering the potential for multiple fictions to be invented and various roles to be fulfilled. Here, a sole collection of individual portraits is not interesting, it is the whole pattern that characters, events and spaces knotted together form – a potential definition for the word destiny, or alternatively, Destiny.

Béna’s way of treating the space is like looking at an uncharted territory and imaginary beyond, while the time span is strongly overlapping, even disappearing. The artist plays successfully with the idea of ordinary and expected, transforming these notions towards extraordinary and spectacular, and treats the question of mise-en-scène in a sculptural way. Here the strategic choice of corporate environment is particularly interesting: being by definition a parapublic space, the question on the role reserved for visitors is left unanswered. Thus, the question lingers, whether we are invited to play an active role against the corporate background, or does the set-up rely solely on posthumanist mindset.

Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.

Courtesy of Joseph Tang gallery, Paris. Exhibition “Destiny”, EMBA / Galerie Édouard Manet, Gennevilliers.

Julie Béna studied fine arts the Villa Arson in Nice, France, and at the Royal Academy of Arts in Brussels, Belgium. She has exhibited at the Palais de Tokyo, Fondation Calouste Gulbenkian and Display Art Projects in Paris, Song Eun Art Space in Seoul, Korea, at Nettie Horn in London, Fonderie Darling in Montréal, and was a resident at Le Pavillon at the Palais de Tokyo in 2012-2013.

Julie Béna

Galerie Édouard-Manet

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Richard Fauguet – Bivalve & Monocouche

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Merci d’enlever vos chaussures à l’entrée. I do as expected, taking my shoes off, when entering the Parisian gallery Art : Concept. This gesture is accompanied by an unfamiliar feeling in a public gallery space, triggering a sense of intimacy. I am now allowed to touch the warm and soft carpet covering the gallery’s floor: this chemical-looking sea, as described in the press release, provides a smooth, yet somewhat disturbing ground for the works of the French artist Richard Fauguet. The bright yellow color is flashing in my eyes. Still, I feel comfortable walking around in the space, feels like I’m entering someone’s living room.

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

In the first room of the gallery, a selection of clay heads can be found lying on the floor, displaying the latest work of Fauguet. A moment of tranquility is present, as if the heads were floating, or rather, drifting in the space. Yet, there is a strong feeling of scrutiny announcing its presence – but who is observing who, I am not so sure about. In this personal exhibition of the artist, entitled aptly Bivalve & Monocouche, Fauguet proposes sculptures of clay heads, double faces to be exact, whose eyes are formed of bivalves with empty shells. This rather sculptural, or collage-like approach is contrasted with the use of cubis: folio containers, which are often used for cheap wine, serve as pillows for the resting heads. These marine creatures, devoid of any possible body language, with their poignant, yet empty eyes, evoke inevitably the question on portrait. More precisely, a study on woman portrait is proposed, however through a curious notion of aesthetics: distorted, even dreadful Gorgon figures are suggested with a highly organic approach.

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

The exhibition continues in a smaller room located at the back of the gallery space, where we can once again find clay heads, this time accompanied by glass plate drawings installed on a shelf. This creates a dynamic interplay in the gallery space, when proposing a different kind of study on distorted feminine figures. Once again, something bothering is present: this time seducing poses are disturbed by the visible crack-like compositions on the plate. Again, an act of seduction is taking place, but the abstract figures remain still inaccessible. I can see my own gaze and figure reflecting from the glass.

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Bivalve & Monocouche as an entity reveals to be a collage: a combination of several types of universes, one being essentially organic, even raw, yet combined with a world of still poses and empty-looking eyes. Perhaps a suggestion of a double-headed figure of the God Janus, marking a passageway, a beginning and an ending, or rather a proposal of a figure of Narcissus? This is left open, but the artist succeeds in proposing multiple concurrent universes, and the exhibition as a whole takes shape of a collage, which is constantly being reframed.

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Concerning the history of portraiture, a citation of Georges Didi-Huberman seems apt to end this text, as used in the press release: “The tradition of portrait maybe began the day when our eyes looked down with terror and dismay at a loved and familiar face fallen to the floor and never to get up again” (Georges Didi-Huberman: “Le Visage et la Terre” in Artstudio, summer 1991, n°21).

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Courtesy of Art : Concept

Richard Fauguet was born in 1962 in La Châtre. He lives and works in Châteauroux. His work has been purchased by numerous public collections among which: Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris; Frac Île-de-France, Paris; Frac Limousin, Limoges; MAC/VAL, Vitry-sur-Seine and Les Abattoirs, Toulouse. Several personal exhibitions have been consecrated to his work in the last years: Vivement demain, MAC/VAL, Vitry-sur-Seine (2012) ; Selon Arrivage, Art : Concept, Paris (2011) ; Ni vu, ni Connu, Frac Limousin, Limoges (2011) ; Pas vu, pas pris, frac Île-de-France, Paris (2009).

Art : Concept 

Stefano Calligaro – All-Yo! Crypto-Phylo-s’

The following text was written, edited, and mixed by Stefano Calligaro-Daria Dumitrescu-Maciej Parzydło.

Photo  Lucian Indrei, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

Photo Lucian Indrei, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

*A discreet Charm
and a good Crémant to please Picard: Cryptomaniacs you’re advised!
Zalten spighel skuten zitten: – Oui! Oui! compriendo comprindo understand!
Je necesit un pen! Un marker digital pour mon meta-delight se il vous plaît! Imediatmont! aici!
Essenzialmente si tratta di non oltrepassare le zone delimitate dalle linee di obliterazione personale
or lets say it in English: It’s all about business and distractions.
Perennial artiquette s will be rounded with a soft green color in the late winter and spring.
– Availability: twelve months a year with peaks in spring and fall.
The Artiquettes queen is here to help. Please pull off a leaf.

Photo  Lucian Indrei, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

Photo Lucian Indrei, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

Rotójąca wirófka. Laboratoryjne rozszczepienie of reality. Silicon and liquid-crystal cream.
Digital wellness for missing parts of our biological identity = ****k?? is this the case?
I mean: is it the case to talk about this? and what about? what about Eco-systems floating the Net
and “speak to peak”? -Directions? it seems Enjoyable “oui” Enjoyable! nous epoque, nous divertissement
,,,,PirateBay,,,,la valeur de la virgule dans la société de la digi-langue!

– Artiquettes où êtes-vous?
– ici, je suis ici! dans la monitor!! Gmail, ma Google Docs.

Photo  Roland Vaczi, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

Photo Roland Vaczi, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

The acid thunder set ups the protest. Migration of pleasure become impossible; Bank crash! Fininito.
Caring or….magnificent, yes magnificent ladies from the Display suddenly stopped feeding sweet bytes of my .sdi, .dsi, .dpa, .dos, .gpr, .row, .aop, .sko, .acy, .qog, .vbd, .etc Even high frequency stream
of space-key is marbly re-invisible and heavy-sweetened!

oh! am I distracting you? taking your attention from the Cheers smiles?:
“WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET, AND YOU AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YET!”

P-O-M P-O-M A-L-G-O-R-I-T-H-M ! P-O-M P-O-M J-U-M-P A T-W-I-S-T !

Photo  Roland Vaczi, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

Photo Roland Vaczi, Courtesy of Sabot, Cluj

– Ha! Gentlemen par excellence remember to SHAVE ALWAYS AGAINST (precisely “hair” I can say, but
“soundinity” of that word is not my cup of tea)
Wikileaks to Wikipics .
Kolab Now All you Pam-Pam .
Pom-Pon.
Use your skills to pay the bills.
I love tattoos. And mine symboli z e s who I really am.
– Logician: A sausage has two ends.
– Gentleman: I have two ends.
– Logician: Then you’re a sausage.
– Gentleman: So I am a sausage?
– Logician: And the contrary is also true.
Transcent all these JELL-Os:
[liquorice smells soo good]
agastache blue liquorice picholine blewits, blewits everywhere Lotta Lollies Tutti Frutti phthalocyanine
NO ARTIFICIAL DYES
thank you
TNKU!!

Sabot Gallery

 

Starring – Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

I perfectly remember when I got closer to Sabine’s sensibility and I set with her at Bar Love’s counter to share drinks and thoughts about her art activity.

An e-mail exchange begun then and she invited me to visit her studio where she received me with a coffee and a typical Carnival’s cake. I see her like this: a mix between a strong, bitter woman and a sweet child reflecting her daughter Napoline.

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

My attention was caught firstly by the works with glass she made, a parallelism to the research on self-portrait by shooting herself in passport photos. The following step was to make portraits of people she knew by using the glass and other materials for the details. The answer on one own’s identity is never clear but esoteric.

This subject goes on with the use of her name contaminated by other people that then overstep the artist’s level by wearing Sabine Delafon’s name on a t-shirt – as one of her collaborations with the brand Marios – or sign her business cards.

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Then at one point watching her works’ documentation became like a card’s game full of iconic symbols: the four-leaved clover, the heart, the star. Repetitiveness and multitude are her way of spreading these words, making them visible around cities for a wide public and response in a “legal vandalism”.

Another present theme is the survey on “the other half of the orange”, as she likes to define it, by trying to find lookalikes in the universe and human kind here seen as unknown, God and hereafter.

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

This impossibility gave life to Sabine Delafon Corporation, her fulfill by making people / other artists part of her works. But not even this was enough and The Emilie La Reine Foundation was created with anonymous collaborations and by using a second-name, Emilie, pretending to be a queen. “I am hungry” billboards and artists’ exchanges are on going after that.

I see her as the feminine version of Franco Vaccari.

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Courtesy of Sabine Delafon

Sabine Delafon