Simon Starling – Black Drop Ciné-roman

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

In 2012 Simon Starling presented Black Drop, a film about the transit of Venus observations and their relationship to early Cinema. Predicated on the idea that the 2012 transit may be the last to be recorded on celluloid (the next transit will occur in 2117), Black Droptracks the development of the French astronomer Jules César Janssen’s innovative “photographic revolver”, a device designed to counter human error in timing the crucial moments of Venus’ contact with the edge of the sun.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

The device was influential in the development of the Lumiére brothers’ cinematograph.Together with a small film crew, Starling travelled to Hawaii and Tahiti to observe and film the 2012 transit of Venus, and the sites of previous observations and photo-documentation (Point Venus, Tahiti and Honolulu). The recording of the event formed the basis for the production of a film about the relationship between the transit of Venus and the history of cinema, as framed by the parenthesis formed by the 1874 and 2012 transits.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

The book is a kind of ciné-roman on the film project. It will include a shot-by-shot account of the film with the voiceover as accompanying subtitles. It tells the story of the relationship between astronomy, photography and the beginnings of moving image technology, together with echoes about epic voyages and vast distances.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

Born in 1967 in Epsom, England, Simon Starling attended Nottingham Polytechnic and the Glasgow School of Art. His work is in the permanent collections of distinguished museums, such as the Tate Modern, London; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Starling has had solo exhibitions at numerous international venues including Tate Britain (2013); the Power Plant, Toronto (2008); Städtischen Kunstmuseum zum Museum Folkwang, Essen (2007); Portikus, Frankfurt (2002); UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002); Kunstverein Hamburg (2001). In 2003, the artist represented Scotland at the 50th Venice Biennial. In 2005 he won the Tate’s Turner Prize.

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