Dogs in the Living Room – Farid Rasulov

Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion
Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion

We met in Paris the independent curator Azad Asifovich in occasion of a visit to the exhibition Dogs in the Living Room at Galerie Rabouan Moussion. He explained us how, Farid Rasulov’s exhibition, took a great effort in terms of work: 550 meters of carpet interiors to be pasted by four assistants helping the artist, in order to cover the entire surface of the gallery, including every detail such as cups and books, throughout one month of installation. According to Rasulov: “Paris has a different mood, a special aura, a perfume. The city is like an obsession. I don’t know what attracts me, but I know this is my city”. Dogs in the Living Room is, as a matter of fact, developed all over in the Parisian gallery, from the floors to the ceilings, with traditional carpets from Azerbaijan. In November 2010 the Azerbaijani carpet was proclaimed a masterpiece of Intangible Heritage by UNESCO, in 2011 and 2013 Farid Rasulov’s Carpet Interiors were presented at Venice Biennale, at the Azerbaijan Pavilion.

Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion
Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion

Born in Shusha, in the region of Karabakh, historical center of carpet waving, Farid Rasulov lives in Baku, Azerbaijan, ancient center of carpet weaving, but decides instead for this exhibition, to look for the fabric in Germany, and having it printed in Russia. A clash between the East and the West, a sign of a system of production, almost completely industrialized and globalized, and an artist who keeps an eye on the ancient patterns, repeated infinitely on the surface of the white cube of the gallery. Rasulov’s practice seems to be rooted in a Western universe represented by the white cube, and by the furnitures, but with an Eastern touch offering to the visitor a kaleidsocope of arabesques from his country, a traditional know-how transmitted from generation to generation. He said to the curator Azad Asifovich: “I use the carpet as a symbol of the Orient. It covers the Western interior, coexisting, it’s eternal”.

Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion
Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion

In this conflict there are sometimes victims: human beings such as animals and plants. Dogs, but also cats, donkeys, horses, pigs, and other animals’ sculptures he adopted in his past installations, are victims of this dualism. It doesn’t really matter which kind of animal Rasulov is representing, in his work they are always a symbol of life and nature. And all of them are bright white, a representation of nature in its purity. The white dogs of the exhibition are looking out of the windows, sitting or standing. They are helpless animals without soul, faithful friends stucked inside the orientalized white cube and looking for light and freedom. Farid Rasulov’s installation at Galerie Rabouan Mouission is inspired by the Guba carpet waving school, but the artist will present in every installation a different region, every pattern being influenced by the variety of landscapes, from where the various color pigments are extracted: Baku, Shirvanm Ganja, Qazakh, Karabakh, Nakhchivan and Tabriz.

Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion
Courtesy of Galerie Rabouan Moussion

Bom and raised in a family of scientists, Farid Rasulov, was destined to a bright future in medicine, but In 2007, after graduating from the University of Medicine in Azerbaijan, he decides to move away from science. Living in Baku, the capital, and regularly attending artist studios, he discovers, through contemporary art, a way of life, the concept of freedom of choice, new languages. This radical shift leads him to participate in the 53rd and 55th Venice Biennale. Farid Rasulov is an artist devoting intense use of diverse energy mediums: painting, 3D, animation, sculpture, installation. More informations about his practice in Alice Cazaux’s critical text Anatomie d’une Tradition.

Galerie Rabouan Moussion

 

 

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