Analia Saban – Outburst

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

This summer, Praz-Delavallade presents the fourth solo exhibition of Los Angeles and New York-based artist Analia Saban. Over the last ten years, the artist has been interested in deconstructive processes. By exposing process and materials, and by dismantling artworks of various media to later reassemble them in unconventional ways, the artist reveals the artwork’s existence as both a physical and a social construction.

Titled Outburst, this new exhibition juxtaposes two new bodies of work pursuing similar concerns. The Big Bang Series (in Ten Steps), a piece in concrete and marble on canvas, references the explosion and expansion of the universe, while the ensemble of eight one-point-perspective laser-sculpted graphite drawings, Outburst (Living Room), emphasize the emotional outbursts that could happen within the domestic space. While the use and showcasing of perspectival lines accentuate the presence of the vanishing point and clearly link the two bodies of work, there is also an evident contrast between the toughness and heaviness of the concrete works and the fragility of the laser-burned paper.

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

With Outburst (Living Room), a laser-sculpted drawing piece in eight parts portraying an explosion within an interior domestic space, Analia Saban shows us an image of organized chaos. Combining the new technique of a laser machine with the traditional practice of perspectival rendering using graphite on paper, the artist intentionally carves out and burns the paper to create fragile drawings of negative space. In these depictions, the shelves of a bookcase have exploded and the books are frozen on a grid that extends from a vanishing point.

In the main scene, we are reminded of Paolo Ucello, whose battle scenes use the system of perspective to draw out the horrors of chaos. Three other drawings represent close-ups of some of the objects that are floating in the air during the outburst. Facing these works, Saban presents a new series of negative imprints resulting from the laser-sculpting process, creating a spatial play between positive and negative. Acting as support or container of the charcoal and paper residues from the process of burning, these negative imprints are also reminiscent of the early photographic technique of the photogram or sun print – the intact and therefore opaque parts operate as an object would, when placed on photosensitive paper, and the laser that had become a cutting device comes close to its true nature: that of light itself.

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

In the second body of work presented in the exhibition, Big Bang Series (in Ten Steps), Saban offers a rational counterpoint to the tumult of the Outburst series. This piece is part of an ongoing exploration of wall pieces comprised of concrete slabs affixed to canvas. The concrete which could have served as the indispensable foundation of a house, is rendered useless and elevated at the same time when incorporated into a work of art. In this case the aggregate of particles of sand and marble stone that is visible in the first piece of the series, slowly but steady densifies as the marble gradually fills up the entire canvas space. Playing with the opposing phenomena of control and chaos, Analia Saban’s work leads us somewhere in between casualness and a desire for total control. The attraction of these works lies in their formal rigor: through technique they have taken control of the intrinsic chaos.

Born in 1980 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saban currently lives and works in Los Angeles and New York. She received a BFA in Visual Arts from Loyola University in New Orleans in 2001, followed by an MFA in New Genres at the University of California in Los Angeles in 2005. Saban’s works are represented in the collections of the Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College, the Hammer Museum at UCLA in Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Norton Museum of Art in Florida, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Outburst – Analia Saban at Praz-Delavallade until June 28, 2014.

Praz-Delavallade

Advertisements

Postcodes – Introduced by Gabriel Lima, Pedro Wirz and Anamauê

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Context, complexity, distance, identity, relationship, are the main themes that  can describe the ‘Postcodes’ project, curated by Pedro Wirz and Gabriel Lima, which recently opened in São Paulo, Brazil. Housed in Casa do Povo, an historic cultural spot of the city and important political resistance point during military dictatorship of the country, ‘Postcodes’  is a project that through the cracks and distances of modernity, explores the possibilities and different ways of doing and understanding art.

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

In an increasingly faster reality, which creates the need to codify and integrate an ever increasing amount of information from different sources : Pedro Wirz and Gabriel Lima, Brazilians with a solid and educated European- western background,  have created an active and lively cultural exchanging  platform in which to carry and where to relate the complexity of each artist’s works practices.
Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Surfing on the demolished distances of contemporary, they, in the main city of the distinctive country of  cultural mash-up,  give life to a project – manifesto of what is now  São Paulo – or maybe of what it has always been. A project that has the will and the ability to catalyze and accelerate energies that wind and move into one of the largest cities in the world.
Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

In a mix of vision, in which different identities will approach to a single context, the invited artists – Adriano Costa, Pedro Neves Marques, Dan Rees, Mandla Reuter, Emanuel Rohss, Max Ruf, Sanja Todorovic, Erika Verzutti and Hannah Weinberger – are terminal and departure  points for a dialogue that connects them in an intertwined way with the city whose “typical”  dishes are sushi and pizza.
Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

Courtesy of Postcodes and Casa do Povo

A cultural landmark in the city of São Paulo, Casa do Povo, boasts a historical role in the city as both site and testimony of important cultural initiatives in the past, such as the experimental theatre company TAIB, the vanguard school Scholem Aleichem, and as a site of intense political resistance to the military dictatorship.

 

 

J’ai Froid – Scandinavia at castillo/corrales

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

There has been a long tradition of relationships between castillo/corrales and Scandinavia. Some find this connection a little perplexing or dubious; for others it’s not a problem at all. The remaining ones will claim they didn’t really notice it until now. On Friday May 16, castillo/corrales inaugurates the exhibition J’ai Froid, which presents works by Matias Faldbakken and Sidsel Meineche Hansen, grouped together by Joachim Hamou with illustrations from Theodor Kittelsen’s book Svartedauen (“Black Death”) and photographs from the image archive of Asger Jorn’s Scandinavian Institute of Comparative Vandalism.

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

J’ai Froid addresses the myth of Scandinavian culture and the paradox of formulating a subversive strategy based on socio-economic privilege. Tapping into the unrest and general neoliberalisation of the Scandinavian welfare-states, a new generation of artists’ interest in anarchistic expressionism and Black Metal has emerged. Their interest in this subculture lies perhaps in the promise of an oppositional position and the potential for expressing angst, distress and feelings of being overwhelmed. J’ai Froid foregrounds a split position where visual artists are trying to negotiate their own position, knowing that it is impossible to reiterate an authentic expression and to use irony as a counterstrategy.

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

In J’ai Froid, Matias Faldbakken (b. 1973), the artist and author of the acclaimed novel Scandinavian Misanthropy, presents two sculptures indebted to the anti-establishment threads of Norwegian expressionism and black metal. In a new series of prints, London-based artist Sidsel Meineche Hansen (b. 1981) appropriates Edvard Munch’s woodcut printing technique, merging the “spirit of the wood” with her research into the prescription of psychoactive drugs and chemical management of nervousness.

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

Courtesy of castillo/corrales

Theodor Kittelsen (1857-1914) was a Norwegian illustrator and artist, and a member of the Norwegian romantic nationalism movement, who dropped out of the city buzz to live the life of a recluse in the countryside. An original copy of his book Svartedauen (“Black Death”) from 1900 is included in the exhibition. The Danish artist Asger Jorn (1914-1973) established The Scandinavian Institute of Comparative Vandalism which comprised the extensive but unfinished archive of 10.000 years of Nordic Folk Art documented by the French photographerGerard Franceschi (1915-2001). A fragment of this archive completes the exhibition J’ai Froid, which will slowly accompany us as we move towards the heart of the Parisian summer.

 

Alex Da Corte – Delirium I

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

We live in our phones although we sometimes occupy space beside other people. The telephone is our closest ally, the mediator between the present and our projection of the present. It is in some ways a portal to our dreams. It can be a portal to hell if used properly.

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery


Scene One Room One
The viewer (you) enters the room. The smell of Calvin Klein’s Obsession lingers. There is an acrylic tiled floor. Its pattern is a lattice-type grid; the spaces in between the lattice lines are mirror. It appears as if you might have to walk only on the lines for fear of falling into nothingness. There is a green mirror shelf on the wall. As you enter you see yourself in green. You are comforted. You think of money. You are happy with what you see. You are hopeful that you may find someone like that after the opening at the gallery. You walk further into the space because you see a tapestry/quilt with roses on it. 
You think it’s an Hermes scarf; it makes sense since you are in a fancy part of town. There are beautiful roses on it. You see red. You are lustful. You see a photo of a woman lying on the floor. You pass by the other side of the green mirror shelf. There is a bloody knife on the shelf. You wonder if the woman is okay. She is clutching the beautiful Hermes scarf. You look at the scarf closely. and realize it is covered in blood drops and spiders and scabs. This scarf is in disguise. It is covered in blood drops and spiders and scabs. It is not the silk you imagined it would be, it is a horrible nylon banner, a cheap knockoff, a myth. You didn’t notice the broken eggs on the floor because you were cloudy from the CK perfume. This place is Hell and you hope to wake up. End scene.

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Scene Two Room Two
The space is divided by laminated Ikea shelves. There are several knockoff Hermes scarves on the wall. There is food on the shelves and on the scarves. You want to eat it. You see two pictures of your lover. She is your monster and you are her doctor Frankenstein. You have made her all that she is and could be in your mind. You find that you are on the other end of the telephone. You have her by the bolts. You can bring her joy. You understand she is lost without you. You are cocksure. This is your home, your poem, so do what you want. You are in this space and feel comfortable, warm. You are the maker. You believe you are in control now.

Alas, all is not well. You grow hungry in the space and reach for the food. It is rubbery and tart. It provides no comfort. A telephone rings. But you see no phone. It may be your lover calling but you cannot pick up. Maybe she is calling you back. Maybe the love you made is truly the only thing that will cure your Hell. But in dreams, unfortunately, time is long and slow.

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

Courtesy of David Risley Gallery

David Risley Gallery 

Gabriele De Santis – Drop it like it’s hot

After exhibiting at Frutta Gallery in Rome, Gabriele De Santis (born in 1983, Rome) has a following solo exhibition, a project room on view at Galerie Chez Valentin, Paris. In his work, the artist plays with different details, mixing up diverse elements and materials such as marble, paintings and installations, enriched with references to the use of language and humour in art – thus interrogating our standardized concepts and their limits. The following excerpt is a discussion between the artist and Adam Carr.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Adam Carr: The original idea was for me to write a text on your work. Although, when approaching the text it became clear that your new work is somewhat of a point of departure from your earlier pieces, which we have spoke about at length in person before. I thought, then, that would it be good instead to discuss together what seems to be a new direction in your practice.
Gabriele De Santis: Departure connotes, for me at least, an exit. Rather, I think my work is continuously developing around the intrinsic points of interest for me: the modular contexts of the written word and its ambiguity; and the humour of every day life and how both of these can intertwine with artworks.

Adam: What was your starting point behind the new works?
Gabriele: I was reading ‘In Search of Lost Tima’ by Proust whilst I was watching the repeat of the great match Chicago bulls VS Utah Jazz of 1998 on TV where Michael Jordan played an amazing game. I began to think of how they are interlinked – their simultaneous ambitions of measures.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Adam: Could speak about your use of marble as a kind of support for your new paintings? Marble has great historic and geographic links of course, so I was wondering if it is of importance as to which location you source it from…
Gabriele: I use the marble as a way to utilize mark-making. On top of richly patterned marbles, I paint monochrome negatives of parenthesis marks. In diptych form, they are a suggestion of opening and closing, allowing the viewer to imagine their own contents within the succession of beginning and end. I am really interested in the reference to language – parenthesis gives extra information or context to sentences. In a similar manner, this series is an attempt to add extra context to painting. Using the background texture, pre- made by nature, and imposing areas of monochrome on top, I am playing with the hierarchy of background and foreground within painting. Other works in the series play with the ambiguity of language and the symbols that create it. The simple ‘(‘ parenthesis mark is rotated, forming a smile. Other parenthesis marks seem to become mustaches, music notes or utensils. You are right; the marble comes from different places – from all over the world. I guess it is like multiple languages speaking at once. I also like the idea the marble takes so long to form. Those slabs have been witness to the world for centuries. The paint on top is applied really quickly – it’s like two different dimensions of time on one surface. Their relationship to the skate canvas works is interesting, as they are opposite. The canvas works imply speed and movement, whereas the marble itself is such a slow-forming material. Moreover, the hashtag image that I frequently use is a reference to instant imaging, the contrary of marble.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Adam: The new works have a lot of humour attached to them. Could you speak about that?
Gabriele: I have an interest in personifying the artworks, giving them human attributes – allowing them to form a personality. We are surrounded by humor and many of my works are an amalgamation of things I find ironic or funny.

Adam: Speaking about inducing personality in your work, where your particular approach seems to result in your painting and sculptures taking on different personas, there is a whole series of pieces you are producing that animate plinths, a museum standard, raising its status and giving it character. While most of the pieces in the series turn the plinth into something much than an object used to display works, some play in line with convention in that they display works by other artists, a kind of duel function…
Gabriele: Yes, I have always been interested in the idea of the plinth as a support; it seems this classic rigid structure, which we have become to accept as an efficient way to display sculpture. I always find it disturbing that is seems to stop motion – but artworks (at least the ideas around them) are always in motion. Mounting the plinths on roller-skates became a metaphor to explain the constant evolvement of ideas and movement around works. It also again personifies human attributes, which I really like. I have collaborated in the past with other artists, allowing them to place their artworks on top. In the case of this show, I have placed two together, with touching cocktail glasses – it’s a sentiment. We assume that artworks within exhibitions must have a relationship with one another – I wanted to play on that.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chez Valentin

Adam: The roller-skates that you just mentioned, as well as basketball and specifically the Nike Jordan logo, crop up in your new work frequently. They appear to me to be used as motifs within the work and deployed for reasons of familiarity, a reference to American culture…
Gabriele: I think rather than their aesthetic properties of familiarity, I am more interested in their abilities to let you move. Indeed, the idea to let the artwork move is the main idea for me amongst these works. The Jordan symbol, again, is an idea of illustrating movement – reaching new heights, perhaps referring to the American Dream, the hunger for success. I like the idea of heights within the works, again a suggestion of competition or limits. The plinths are raised off the ground; the t-shirts enveloping the canvas seem to leave a white part of the canvas bare at the bottom, a bit like a midriff, as though it is human and stretching.
Adam: A playground of performativity!

Drop it like it’s hot – Gabriele De Santis at Galerie Chez Valentin until May 17, 2014.

Galerie Chez Valentin
Frutta Gallery

Goodguys (Gran Riserva)

Courtesy of Gasconade

Courtesy of Gasconade

Goodguys are a crew, a gang, a group, an invasive and heavy presence. Unwanted guests, who require a lot of attention. (Gran Riserva) stands for alcohol or cigars, the best that can be offered in town; A rare product, unique, a gift to offer for special occasions; selected rarities like precious stones. Goodguys are the difference between the ordinary and special, the focus point in the space. Their nature leads them to be necessary  so as  circumstance  become unique and exclusive.

Courtesy of Gasconade

Courtesy of Gasconade

Furniture and furnishings are removed, TV and paintings are replaced, Daniele Milvio’s living room is only for the Goodguys. The walls are still marked by signs of the frames which occupied the wall before Goodguys ( Gran Riserva ) works would take their place.  Like a wedding tuxedo, Goodguys (Gran Riserva) is the vintage cognac matched with the rare cigar, smoked  with important guests in your living room, while admiring your collection of art made of canvas,  gleaming copper plates,  metal sculptures, decorated  eggs,  portraits,  prints and a rare coffee service .

Courtesy of Gasconade

Courtesy of Gasconade

Since November 2013, Gasconade put a pied-a-terre  in Rome, with ‘Guest’ project – a series of exhibitions hosted in a private home  in Via  Ricciotti, 9. Daniele Milvio (b. 1988) Italian artist, is the owner of the space; after his studying at Brera Academy in Milan, he is now living and working in Rome. ‘Guest’ proposes  and submits  a parallel exhibition program to the Milanese space of Gasconade. A space that  cause different allestitive challenges with its atypical exhibition environment,  lived throughout the exhibition period.

Courtesy of Gasconade

Courtesy of Gasconade

‘Guest’ , as the name suggests, is a project intimately linked to the idea of hospitality, both for the artists and the audience, which find themselves to enjoy the show in a domestic  background. Goodguys ( Gran Riserva ) ( April  5 to May  10 , 2014)  is the second ‘Guest ‘ exhibition.  Gasconade presents   the works of 7 artists from Milan : Pietro Agostoni (b.1990), Gianluca Belloni (b.1991), Alessandro Carano (b.1984), Isabella Costabile (b.1991), Matteo Pomati (b.1989), Giangiacomo Rossetti (b.1989), Giulio Scalisi (b.1992).

Gasconade

 

Fix – South Kiosk

Courtesy of South Kiosk

Courtesy of South Kiosk

South Kiosk invited four artists to investigate the relationship between time and land by exploring alternative approaches to the photographic process. The fix is the last stage of the creative process, after all conceptual and practical decisions have been made; photographic and photochemical. It acts as a statement of artistic intent, committing decisions to perpetuity. This finale of a complex chemical process allows for images, as observed by Roland Barthes, to “settle like a fine rain” upon their paper or celluloid base.

Courtesy of South Kiosk

Courtesy of South Kiosk

For the exhibition in their permanent gallery on Ayres Street, South Kiosk invites four artists to investigate the relationship between time and land by exploring alternative approaches to the photographic process as well as incorporating experimental darkroom techniques into their practice. The works that make up this exhibition will offer us an insight into landscapes that extends beyond the limitations of the traditional photograph as a tool for documentation.

Courtesy of South Kiosk

Courtesy of South Kiosk

Joachim Sefzick’s panoramic images offer the viewer an ordinarily impossible perspective on a familiar landscape that is often fleeting. Whilst retaining this sensation of motion, they can examine individual points in time, within the same image. Subverting the definitive nature of the fix, Ryan L. Moule’s work takes on a more ephemeral state, one that escapes the apparent permanence of documentary photography by focusing on the temporalities produced by still and moving image technologies. His subjects often reflect the temporal instability of his chemically unfixed works, such as rooms in homes that are on the verge of collapse between the sea and the land.

Courtesy of South Kiosk

Courtesy of South Kiosk

However, Agnieszka Kozlowska’s approach explores the status of a photograph as a physical trace rather than purely an image. Whilst her work shows photography as a natural phenomenon that takes place essentially independently of human intervention, Gareth Owen Lloyd embraces the alchemical history of photography to create out of time apparatus that combine networked digital screens, enlarger parts and photographic paper. For ‘Fix’ he will build a surveying tool that will expose a realtime-feed from the solar and heliospheric observatory onto light sensitive paper.

 

South Kiosk