Emanuel Röhss – Knut Ljungfelt

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

A mellow lit high end Swedish restaurant interior, February, lunchtime.

Where the fuck is Beatrice?, Knut thought, starring at his Bovet Fleurier 46 watch through half closed eyes as he uncomfortably sat waiting at a corner table in restaurant KB downing a vodka tonic.

Waiter, another, he called out to no one in particular.

Beatrice walked in. White blouse underneath this season’s black denim Balmain jacket and tight ivory leather skirt. Her hair was extremely blonde, her eyes bright blue, framed by heavy dark eyeliner, she gave an aura of undeniable sensual confidence.
She was amused when she glanced at her waiting cavalier with his intensely arduous face.

You where supposed to be here 10 minutes ago!

My aerobics class with Daniel at the F&F went a little over. I always finish.

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

You’re never ever at the gym, if you went there it was to fuck your personal trainer.

Don’t be jealous.

A bald waiter in all black appeared next to the table

Today’s lunch specials are a wild goose salad with caramelised cranberries, lemongrass and bourbon reduction, a Norwegian wild salmon steamed on a bed of seaweed with a gold extract and chili salt, a reindeer fillet with virgin asparagus and honey powder, or a….

Give us whatever is already on the plates over there I don’t care, and a Dom Perignon 1996 – in half a shake!

Someone could use some tranquilisers to bring down his coke hangover from last night…

Shut up! I need to be at Riddarhuset in 45 minutes, then I have an appointment with John from AFGX, and a conference call with LA and Hong Kong at the office, your unpunctuality doesn’t make things easier. And by the way why are you dressed like that?

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Like what?

Slutty

I dressed as if I was going for lunch with you.

He blinked like a notorious epileptic as he was looking from the stucco ornaments in the ceiling to his beeping iPhone 5SX and typing something cryptic, then back at his Bovet Fleurier 46 and breathed heavily. In one motion, as the waiter came up from behind, he grabbed the Dom Perignon out of the shiny ice bucket and poured it’s content to the brim of their red wine glasses at a 90 degree angle making the liquid flow out over the edges to create a Jacuzzi of French sparkles on the white tablecloth. The bald waiter came in, this time carrying something looking like electrified chicken legs in pink dressing – the wild goose salad sir.

For a moment they silently starred at the fluorescent cadaver, then, obviously in an attempt to address Knut with something important Beatrice took on a face like the secretary opening a meeting at the chamber of commerce.

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Courtesy of Project Native Informant

Your family expects us to announce our engagement before long.

No no no no he let out to the whole restaurant, not managing to meet her look as all his bodily capacity was consumed by trying to control a spasmodic reaction. Two seconds later a black Volvo limousine V90S appeared outside the window, he grabbed his iPhone 5SX and stood up.

I cannot discuss this right now – I’ve got business to pursue! My team is operating like marines! We sail and we hunt. We can take anything.

Knut threw six 500 kronor bills into the Champagne Jacuzzi, gave out a loud unrecognisable muttering sound towards Beatrice, already in full motion he forgot his Samsoe and Samsoe coat on the hanger and just as the bald waiter started to open the entrance door, he ran through it and jumped into the car.

 Project Native Informant

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Xavier Antin – Offshore

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

I am on the beach, I get into a two-floor office building. There are thousands of mailboxes at the entrance. It is an empty building. I look for the Amazon marketing department. I found it on the first floor, door 12. I go up. The door is closed but I can see through the window a little room, not more than 15 square meters, almost empty. There is a chair, a desk and a computer. On its screen is displayed the Windows 8 logo of the screensaver.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

Someone comes, he wears a maintenance uniform Amazon-labeled. He apologizes to me, opens the door and then closes it. I watch him through the window, he seems to be cleaning but there is nothing to clean. The waste paper basket is empty. He stands in front of the computer and logs in his username password. He updates the Excel software. He opens the mailbox, there is a new message. Without reading it he answers : Office state : operational Maintenance OK Connection OK IP address : 192.168.0.14 Amazon Marketing Service Cayman Office.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Crèvecoeur. Photo: Aurélien Mole

In his second exhibition at Galerie Crèvecoeur, Xavier Antin (born in 1981 in Paris) continues exploring reproduction of images and printings through different media, all combined with a study on spatiality – themes reflecting the artist’s background as a graphic designer.

Xavier Antin at Galerie Crèvecoeur, until May 10, 2014.

Like – But like yeah!

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Don’t miss tonight the opening at Gallery Q, of Like, the show curated by Maja Malou Lyse and Arvida Byström, nordic girls at the vanguard of feminism’s new wave. There will be a Skype Session with readings by Grossmary, Anna Crews, Cristine Brache and Ann Hirsch and a Virtual Dj-set by Girls Get Busy. Girls Get Busy has expanded into a 10,000-follower-strong online platform that distributes other zines and supports female-identified artists, musicians and writers. 

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Two months ago Zing Tsjeng wrote on Dazed an article entitled “The Revolution will be feminised”, Like‘s curators Arvida Byström and Maja Malou Lyse were featured: “There are so many male-dominated places where women aren’t allowed to feel comfortable,” says photographer Arvida Byström, who runs Gal Space, a pink-floored, female-run gallery in east London. “It’s not spoken aloud, like, ‘This is a male-only place,’ even though it is. Females need their spaces to talk, to get together, to realise they’re not being fucking paranoid (about sexism).” 

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Christopher O’Leary wrote another article: “How to Hide from Big Brother” featuring performance artist Jillian Mayer, in Like exhibition, who teaches how to use makeup to hide from cameras on a YouTube tutorial. “The goal, the video advises, is to break up symmetry. If the conventions of cosmetics ask for certain regions of facial structure to be highlighted – cheekbones, nose bridges, lashes, lips – cosmetic camouflage necessitates the opposite. Contours must be masked by irregular misshapes”. 

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Like, u know. The word like is like, seen as something redundant, like the way female coded objects are like, u know, well, the colour pink or u wearing lipstick is seen as something unnecessary, but like, for some people it’s still like pretty enjoyable and it’s not like it’s hurting anyone else really. And then like, the verb ‘to like’ something online is like, you know, when ur getting that ‘like’, you know what ur social value is in a money-driven society. 

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

But like at the same time it’s like based on something pretty positive and like actually some kind of support when like, u know u r liking someone’s selfie. U know, if we like think about ‘liking’ in relationship to selfie haters, well it might not be sellable to like hate on selfies but like, it’s pretty mean. Likeable art by Patricia Alvarado, Gabby Bess, Cristine Brache, Arvida Bystöm, Jennifer Chan, Anna Crews, Rosemary Kirton, Mikkeline Sofie Larsson, Maja Malou Lyse, Jillian Mayer, Molly Soda, Camgirlsproject/Vanessa Omoregie, and more.

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

Courtesy of Arvida Byström & Maja Malou Lyse

 
 

 

The Infinite Possibilities of Modularity – A critical text about Donatien Aubert’s work

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

One year ago I had a terrific conversation with French artist Donatien Aubert entitled :“MATRIX – A trip in Generative art with crystals, flakes and galaxies”Donatien Aubert is the prodigious talent of ENSAPC, the National HigherSchool of Arts of Paris-Cergy. His practice is developed from digital tools: CAD Computer Aided Design, animation, rendered three-dimensional models, computer programs at large. From this, he creates new works: interactive installations, sculptures, videos, photos.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Avid reader of contemporary authors about converging technologies (nanotechnology, genetic engineering, information technology and cognitive technologies), such asJeremy Rifkin and Francis Fukuyama, he structures his original researches in epistemology, logic, art of memory, science fiction, speculative philosophy, ethics and ecology.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

The thesis offered by various futurists, like the transhumanist Raymond Kurzweil, that humanity, through the above-mentioned technologies, could decide about its evolution seems more and more plausible. Changing our empathetic nature, our need for recognition would change our ethics and could therefore destabilize the political systems in which we live.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

After one year, my critical text of his work: “The Infinite Possibilities of Modularity”, 2013, AV, Université Cergy-Pontoise, Paris, has been published. Donatien Aubert deploys a proteiform work which discovery can be accomplished by exploring a field of knowledge that engages in crystallography, molecular structures, and cosmology.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

In this critique I focused my remarks inspired by Aranda/Lasch’s modular designs, particularly by examining the modular aspect of the structures that have interested Donatien Aubert, and unlimited capacity configurations that are likely to occupy these crystalline formations.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Donatien Aubert’s work takes the form of experimental research, bringing together contemporary scientific, epistemological and artistic issues. He develops projects from complex IT processes to articulate his ontological questions problematizing his demonstrations areas.  Each project includes material that qualify space singularly, searching for new possibilities of modularity.

Donatien Aubert

Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Paris

Nature, matter, reality – A talk with Luca Francesconi

 Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli


Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

The text written by curator Jason Hwang, in occasion of the exhibition “Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” is a good starting point for our talk. Here is an excerpt: Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” is an exhibition that looks like a field. An agricultural field that can best be described if included in a production system, embedded in the cycle of nature. A field that extends to the point of including every obvious point of view on reality, and in so doing, bring new light to a story that began when humans started to cultivate directly what supports it, making it part of the same potential of agriculture through the ability to use every phase of their cycle”. What is your relation with nature? 

For me the Nature is a metaphor. Actually I think my field of investigation remains the man’s relationship with reality, understood as the subject more “real” as possible. The material entities at the beginning of the world.

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

You have always been attentive to popular art, in which the materials, simple tools of rural culture, are assuming a metaphysical value and are loaded with meanings in a anthropological reading of reality. The materials like iron, wood, glass, ceramic, plastic, clay are holders of meanings, to create parallel semantic fields in the process of creating the meaning of the works. Have you done any research on the properties of materials? And where do you find them? 

Every element has physical properties: I find this interesting, and still part of the human mind. Part of my research is to do some anthropological research. And in recent years I have documented them in three books that I have been able to publish. I think metaphysics is the right margin to understand what is not seen, but it is understood. In this sense I would suggest to read John of the Cross. 

Normally, I work with some excellent craftsmen, I think that the concept of authorship should be redefined. Sometimes, as in the case Obsidian, this mean to look it where is present. In this sense, is someone else to share with me the experience of “doing” the work. And in that case it is Alessandro Biggio and his project “Arms / Braccia”.

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Almost like a narrative, the artificial element follows the natural processes, in which the passage of time acquires a fundamental role, there is a certain materiality in your work, a certain tactility. If we could state that the natural world stands for something real and tangible, is this aspect of your work a kind of romantic-existential reaction to the new digital world? 

I have worked with “true” materials, because I care to emphasize Nature as metaphor and the Human being as an element. Well, first we should ask “What is the new digital world?”. If you mean “Post-Internet”, I am very interested. But I find there is a generalization. I do not think anyone is interest in doing the works “with technological things”, this is not the goal. This, at least, may be the surface of the problem. 

I recently saw three incredible works, one is “Energy Pangea” by Iain Ball, the other is “non-human expressivity” written (but that explains very well his attitude in the works) by Katja Novitskova on Performance as Publishing (an in print format by Rowing space in London). And last one,  I saw again, after a few years, “Closed Biosphere ” by Tue Greenfort. There are three examples, in my opinion, very good about how you can use in art  “also” some technological or “synthetic” aspects for to talk about anthropological practice  or, at least, what concerns the man  in general. 

So no, I often use “real things”. In my latter show “Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” I’ve also used some real fishes with a mass in the stomach!

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Could we say that in your work there is something similar to what Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev wrote in her essay: Wordly Worlding: The imaginal fields of science/art and making patterns together? (Mousse Magazine 43, page 76) “I argue instead new materialisms, and scientific studies, so that form of art and forms of life can be combined, sharing architectural and creative knowledge with bees and butterflies and beavers, with bacteria and microbes, with eukaryotic cells as well as with software… This neocybernetic, ecological perspective is committed to pleasure, imagination. This is not a “naturistic” backclash against the urban or the artificial, a turn which would be simply neo-Romantic, even detrimental to the scope of becoming-with, and of doing so outside the frames of current production systems”. 

I do not know if my work is “existentialist” or romantic (… maybe because I’m Italian … I joke …!). However, I think,  the dividing line relates to that is true in material reality, which as I have already said, does not corresponds with the tangible and empirical world. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

“The animals they rest – quietly like sculptures. – I am hungry so I eat them like words. – “We are two farmers on a field – We arrange and we order – Farm & Form, – waiting patiently for feedback. – This is our campania felix. – Over there is a sea, and it is filled with fish it is filled with fish. – There is one for you and one for me and.. – tomorrow there will be another for you and another for me. – We are hunters and we see everything eye to eye. – The sun makes a brief appearance and the room is filled with color. – But afterwards, it is still there, beyond my perspective, – beyond my proximity.” is the poem written by Jason Hwang in occasion of”Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo”. How was the collaboration with him?

Our collaboration came about in a very natural way, while some conversation for the preparation of the exhibition “Eux” at Shanaynay (the project space that he co-directs in Paris). I think he has deciphered very well the spirit of the show, and, moreover, that poem is definitely perfect. During our stay in Naples, we also presented “Pangasius” at Madre Museum: a conference – or better yet, a video playlist – about the issues of biophilia and biomorphism so as genetics applied to agriculture. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

You are represented by several galleries like Fluxia in Milan, Valentin in Paris, but your collaboration with Umberto di Marino, Naples, is an historic one. It looks like the gallery has been sustaining your work from the beginning. Do you want to tell us something about your relation with them?

Is exactly as you say: I work with Maria and Umberto Di Marino by long time, and I think this continuity is a value. Naples is a city with a tradition of excellence about contemporary art, although, of course, is not a the production center like London or New York. However, I find that working with them, as well as with institutional spaces in Naples, has many positive aspects and  a sincere cooperation. I can say I have a very good relationship with all  people that I work with. With regard to Di Marino, in the past we have obtained some very good results as the Illy Prize – “Present / Future”, in 2009. And they were among the producers of “Europe 3000”, the work that I presented for “Illuminations”, the 54th Venice Biennale, curated by Bice Curiger in 2011. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Umberto di Marino Gallery 

Meditallucination – Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Meditallucination is 13 new significant paintings on canvas by Geoff McFetridge, presented at V1 Gallery, Copenhagen. McFetridge has developed a distinct visual alphabet and vocabulary, his paintings are minimal, but convey overwhelming possibilities. He puts a lot of faith in the viewer’s ability to finish what he started.  The lack of charged or abundant information enables the viewer’s mind to compensate and stimulates a personal narrative.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

A silhouette of a girl in a bathing suit, barely suggested by the juxtaposition of colors, caught on a cyan pane dissecting the canvas, is at once poetic, humorous, heartbreaking, mundane and magic. The work is titled “The Trap” and is a precise example of McFetridge’s visual language, a tightrope between figuration and abstraction. Remove one color or line, and the composition collapses.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

”I have always been interested in creating work that lies between image and language. Imagery that your mind “reads” as language rather than seeing them as spatial or physical things. These graphic images are for me a way to induce a misfiring of our mind to create a connection, and resonance for the viewer. I want them to feel something, not happy, or sad, but to feel like the letter T”.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

“The images are meditations, in that they come from inside but they are also listening to the world around me. The paintings attempt to deeply engage with reality to try to attain transcendence. Hallucinations in that they are a made of the raw material of our brain, beyond experience, they are found images that are nearly hard wired into our minds.” – Geoff McFetridge, LA, 2014.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Geoff McFetridge, born 1971 USA, is a Los Angeles based artist and multidisciplinary auteur. Instinctively ignoring creative boundaries, McFetridge has created everything from poetry to animation, from graphics to ceramics, from movies to wallpaper. He has created title sequences for the movies Virgin Suicides, Adaptation and Where The Wild Things Are. He recently created artwork and interface design for the Oscar winning movie HER, directed and written by his long time friend and collaborator Spike Jonze. He has exhibited widely throughout Europe, America and Japan.

V1 Gallery

Neïl Beloufa: Mixed notions of realism and mimesis

If you happen to find yourself in Paris, I strongly recommend Neïl Beloufa’s exhibition En torrent et second jour at Fondation d’entreprise Ricard. This exposition provides a perplexing entity, with a combination of sculpture, video, installations and photography. These elements end up being a linear exposure, a real indulgence for the spectator, while displaying a puzzling series of work completed by the final touch of Mihnea Mircan, the invited curator.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

The exhibition space consists of several rooms: in the first one, the artist’s video Brune Renault from 2010 is on view. The settings are quite simplistic: four teenagers finding themselves in a red Renault in a parking garage. It seems like a typical Friday evening, with fleeting moments of disagreements, flirting and jealousy, characters being like classic movie figures. However, a rupture appears once realizing that they only pretend to drive in circles in the parking lot, everything around is moving except them: the passing landscapes flashing through the windows are finally, only a moving stage. The whole video seems like an eternal repetition, with Johnny Hallyday’s song Le penitentier coming from the stereos over and over again: “Haven’t we already been here?” asks one of the girls repeatedly.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

The first room with its projection serves as a starting point and as a conclusion for the rest of the exhibition: when entering the other rooms, we can always discover traces from the first one. Exploring the second room, with its installations and videos, is like witnessing a crime scene: everything seems to be in a chaotic order. There is a disturbing feeling, something is definitely wrong. Still hearing the traces from Hallyday’s song, seeing a video with the very same characters as in the first one: it seems like a reproduction of the first scene, this time with real life settings. We’re part of an experimentation, with video cameras, microphones and surveying eyes: as if we were kept under surveillance, but at the same time, having the power to survey others. This surrealistic experience between different worlds is emphasized with the objects: high tech combined with clumsy, childish like sculptures.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

In the third room, the characters that we’ve already met reappear in different forms, with a monitor presenting a live edit: surveillance camera footage synchronized with Brune Renault. This is where the exhibition reaches its final closure: there are so many necessary, yet unnecessary elements, which held the entity together. The final parts of the exhibition are recurrent with the thematic while questioning several dichotomies: where are the borders between reality and fiction, presence and absence? What does the cause and effect stand for? When merging these components, the artist deconstructs our beliefs and prevailing ideas, while proposing that the fiction can be real, and vice versa.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

Neïl Beloufa at Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, until May 24 2014.