Primavera 2 at Cneai

Courtesy of Melissa Tan and CNEAI =

Courtesy of Melissa Tan and CNEAI

Primavera evokes a sense of spring and (re)beginnings. What does it mean to resume ones artistry in a foreign land? How does one live in a transient space without falling into uniformity? How does one integrate into their surroundings and create their own path through a forest of foreign signs? How does one manipulate their iconography in order not to conform to the expectations of others? How does Paris move one to feel? How does one proceed to prune, transcode and translate the signs around them? The end of their residency finds the artists inspired by the sounds of Paris; their translations can be observed as a tactile “soundscape” of Paris. Primavera 2 is an exhibition of the 2013 Dena Foundation for Contemporary Art artists in residency programme with promotions by Hannah Ryggen at Centre National Edition Art Image (CNEAI), with support from the National Arts Council of Singapore, the city of Milan, the Museo Riso Palermo, the MARCA and Provincia di Catanzaro. Curated by Valentine Meyer and Andrea Fam (Singapore).

Melissa Tan is a designer and sculptor of paper. She has a predilection for ephemeral themes such as crystal formations and the transformations of landscapes. Saying that she explored the streets for this project takes on literality as her work is bound to the pavements of Paris. Using the indentations and markings made out of the stone and gravel that she photographed, Melissa creates musical scores that she feeds through three music boxes. This is her first experimentation with sound sculpture and the product is an abstract soundscape of Paris. Born in 1990, Melissa Tan graduated with a BA (Hons) in Fine Arts from Lasalle College of the Arts in Singapore. Her works have been shown at SAM 8Q (Sg); the Institute of Contemporary Arts Singapore; Strata Art Fair at the Saatchi Gallery (Ldn). She also recently participated in the TV show of OKTO “Watch this space.”

Courtesy of Riccardo Banfi and CNEAI =

Courtesy of Riccardo Banfi and CNEAI

Riccardo Banfi captures the Paris electronic scene in his photographs. He choreographs his scenography to translate the energy witnessed in the photographs and encourages us to dance and experience this energy in places whose inherent identity is not intended for such a purpose. Born in 1986, Riccardo Banffi graduated in Fine Arts from the IUAV in Venice. He measuredly photographs, films and directs what he knows and loves best: the youth, clubbing and electro scenes in Europe. Among the places his works have exhibited include: Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa (Venice); Casa dei Tre Oci (Venice); Agora (Berlin); International Festival of short film from Geneva (Geneva); LOOP Video Art Festival (Barcelona). He was also an artist-in-residence at the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa (Venice) in 2012.

Paolo Parisi creates an ephemeris from his paintings. Capturing everyday experiences, Paolo paints his various invitations to cultural events and overlays them on photographs he has taken. By the use of solid colors, he invites us to project a new space between painting and architecture, intimate and collective. Born in 1965 in Catana, Paolo Parisi lives and works in Florence, where he co-founded the artist-run space “Base / Progetti per l’Arte”. For him “art is experienced as a cognitive act through its various materials and processes. The change of perception and the formation of a personal point of view is fundamental to my work. Initially I explored painting as the basis for my work – it becomes a link between painting and sculpture, mixing the two track prospects for collective and elementary geography.” His work has been presented at RISO | Museum of Contemporary Art, Palermo; Brodbeck Foundation, Catania; Contemporary Art Center Luigi Pecci, Prato; Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich; Quarter | Centroproduzione Arte, Florence; CCGA Castel San Pietro Terme, Neon, Bologna; Go Art Bludenz; XIV International Sculpture Biennale, Carrara; MACRO, Rome Korean Design Center, Seoul; Italian Cultural Institute, Tokyo; Museum of Fine Arts, Hanoi; White House, Singapore; Marella Gallery, Beijing; Galleria Civica Montevergini, Siracusa.

Courtesy of Bruce Quek and CNEAI =

Courtesy of Bruce Quek and CNEAI

Bruce Quek, in addition to transcoding pictures of city lights is for the first time accompanying this developing project with sound. To overcome the fact that we can no longer see the stars at night in the city, Bruce focuses on the modern city’s new form of navigation – urban streetlights. The subtlety of his work comes from the fact that one cannot identify what exactly is being projected – both images and sounds serve to decrease the level of familiarity found in his work. Born in 1986, Bruce Quek lives and works in Singapore. A graduate of Fine Arts (Hons) at Lasalle College the Arts in Singapore, his work has exhibited at SAM 8Q (Sg) and The Substation (Sg). His projects tend to take the distribution and dissemination of information as starting points for various conceptual investigations, critiques of artistic infrastructure, and other wanderings. He takes an interest in many things, but maintains an unhealthy fascination with emergent behaviour, pathological transference, and puns.

Alessandro di Pietro questions the layered nature of audience viewership through his interpretive presentation of Gaspard Noé’s film, “Enter the Void”; presented is a measured orchestration of Alessandro’s documentation of the film. Born between 1988 and 1993, Alessandro di Pietro lives and works in Milan. He graduated with honors from the University of Fine Arts of Brera and is interested in monsters, performance and invention of standards and their dissemination. One example is a ‘false’ Documenta guide that he made from images he captured with a hand-held scanner during his four-day hideout in the exhibition. From these images he published a book whose appearance is identical to the official guide but whose difference is in the non-recognition of the work featured. He has exhibited in the group show “On File” in Platform Space MNAC ANNEX in Bucharest and “Constructed System” as an artist in residence at VIR VIAFARINI in Milan.

Courtesy of Laura Stancanelli and CNEAI =

Courtesy of Laura Stancanelli and CNEAI

Laura Stancanelli’s work focuses on our ability to listen to one another. Audio speakers are placed in a perforated wall and act as a reminder that the word – the spoken voice – in its diversity has the ability to destroy the wall of indifference often found in major cities. Born in 1982 in Catania, she studied Design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome and the Academy of Fine Arts in Perugia and Catanzaro. As a volunteer in cooperatives and rehabilitation centers in the Calabrian region, she is presented with on-the-ground opportunities to practice her questioning of woven social bonds through her performances and installations.

Andrea Fam is first a curator and then an artist. Both her curatorial and artistic practices are informed by a focus on ever-changing socio-political landscapes. She is currently an assistant trainee to the head of exhibitions at La maison rouge where she helped set-up the show “Theatre of the World”, curated by Jean-Hubert Martin. Born in 1987, Andrea graduated from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design with a BA (Hons) in Criticism, Communication and Curation. In 2013 she set up BAN—FAM, an art and design studio, with studio partner Vanessa Ban. BAN—FAM creates and curates contemporary art as well as produces design for art and culture. BAN—FAM has exhibited as part of the group show “Not Too Far Away” at 2902 Gallery (Sg) and recently held their first solo show titled, “1 Dimensional Society”, at the Institute of Contemporary Arts Singapore (Sg); the show was un hommage to Herbert Marcuse’s text, One-Dimensional Man.

 

Cneai 

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Oscar Murillo – If I was to draw a line, this journey started approximately 400km North of the Equator

Courtesy South London Gallery - Photo Mark Blower

Courtesy South London Gallery – Photo Mark Blower

If you are in London, you should go to South London Gallery and keep an eye on Oscar Murillo’s first major (and impressive) solo show in the UK, open until December 1st. Moving his own studio here, Murillo occupies the main gallery space with sculptures, stitched canvases, drawings and films, but also with tables constructed from copper sheets, that he had alreadyused as flooring in previous shows, and he papered the floor with pieces made from pulped biro drawings paper. Oscar Murillo prepares a muscular and choir installation which causes a sense of grandeur, considering the size and the number of the displayed works both; in a violent and explicit statement of his work, Murillo imperatively assert his interest in investigating the atelier work’s prismatic aspects and in endeavouring them into matter and then into form.

Courtesy South London Gallery - Photo Mark Blower

Courtesy South London Gallery – Photo Mark Blower

Chaos, dirt, dust and debris, which we see turned into space and we sense present in environment and in artist’s works, are integral parts of Murillo’s practice: indeed they are “materials” taking part to a complex and balanced selection that then leads to the production of paintings, sculptures, installations, videos and performances. They are a physical-temporal documents subjected to the artist’s handling and use, a manifestation of processes that affects the environment, a self-referential historical stratification free of time . Stitched canvases, biro drawings, concrete balls, tables and paintings, are all activators of ongoing relationships through influences from different backgrounds , from Colombia and its dusties streets through Murillo’s own family, to the neat streets of London; on aesthetic-formal and conceptual level, all of these suggestions carry with themself, the contradictions and complexities of a continuous cultural, social, economics and art systemics cross-over.

Courtesy South London Gallery - Photo Mark Blower

Courtesy South London Gallery – Photo Mark Blower

An active component at the heart of the exhibition and holder of Murillo’s work guidelines, is a lottery that references the popularity of this phenomenon in many cultures. Murillo instigates a situation that highlights some of the complexities of social and cultural encounters, as he has done in previous exhibitions and events, raising several questions about authenticity, value, and the complex relationship between the public, private and commercial sectors of the art world.

Courtesy South London Gallery - Photo Mark Blower

Courtesy South London Gallery – Photo Mark Blower

Each screen-printed ticket is worked on in oil paint by Oscar Murillo and a member of his family, it has its own number and it is signed on the reverse by the artist. Tickets cost £2,500 each and they could be purchased online or by contacting the South London Gallery. Each lottery ticket was inscribed by a calligrapher with the name of the purchaser or intended recipient and will then be displayed in the South London Gallery, throughout Murillo’s exhibition. Lottery winner, the second and third, won three prizes devised by Oscar Murillo.

Courtesy South London Gallery - Photo Mark Blower

Courtesy South London Gallery – Photo Mark Blower

Oscar Murillo (b. 1986, Colombia) lives and works in London. He completed a BA in Fine Art at the University of Westminster, London, followed by MA in Painting in 2012 at the Royal College of Art, London. Recent solo exhibitions and projects include those at Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin; Art Basel; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; MAMA Showroom, Rotterdam; Rubell Family Collection, Miami; Serpentine Gallery, London; Museo de Arte Moderno de Medellín, Colombia. Forthcoming solo exhibitions include Studio Museum Harlem, New York and The Mistake Room, Los Angeles.

South London Gallery

 

Joel Kyack: Point at The Thing That’s Furthest Away

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Praz-Delavallade is pleased to present Joel Kyack’s first exhibition with the gallery, ‘Point at The Thing That’s Furthest Away’. With a particular humor as his consistent material, this show expands Kyack’s project-driven, bricolage practice into seven new paintings and one fountain. ‘I moved into my present studio a year ago, one block from two large thrift stores in a primarily industrial neighborhood of Los Angeles, a thin sliver of land nestled between a river and a railroad and a highway. These stores (and the streets surrounding them) become regional way stations and dumping grounds for unwanted things deemed too much of a pain-in-the-ass or worthless to sell. I began a daily ritual of wandering these stores, monitoring their inventories for objects of interest as potential inclusions in future work.

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Learning the rythms of the stores’ particular stocks, I was drawn to their collections of framed images. Frequently rotating, these images range wildly, from original drawings to posters, from awards to memorabilia, from studio portraits to framed advertisements. These framed images began to find their ways onto canvases, re-contextualized within paintings that aimed at humorous, energetic, gestural efficiency and play between the painted canvas and the framed image.

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

I’m interested in the frame changing the importance of that which it frames, allowing an individual to express or underscore an interest or value by formally re-presenting it. The frame signifies that it is finished and of certain quality, ready for the world-at-large to potentially consume. It locks it down. The paintings free the images from this stasis by using them as raw material in a larger context. This situates the process of making, referencing, and borrowing at center stage. It shines a bright, unashamed light on it. It opens up a conversation about the root of inspiration and interpretation.’

– Joel Kyack
October 2013

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Courtesy of the artist and Praz-Delavallade

Joel Kyack is an artist living and working in Los Angeles. Recent solo projects include ‘Escape to Shit Mountain’ at François Ghebaly, Los Angeles; ‘River / Stream / In-Between’ at Kate Werble, New York; and ‘Superclogger’, a public project produced with the Hammer Museum and LAXART, Los Angeles. Recent performances include ‘Growing Pains Leave Stains’ for Kaleidoscope at MACRO Testaccio, Rome, and ‘Wattis up with this guy?’ at the Wattis Institute, San Francisco. He received his BFA from The Rhode Island School of Design, attented Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and received his MFA from the University of Southern California. His works are part of numerous public and private collections, amongst others the Rubell Family Collection, Miami.

Joel Kyack: Point at The Thing That’s Furthest Away, Nov. 23, 2013 – Jan. 11, 2014 at Praz-Delavallade.

Praz-Delavallade

Martin Creed

Gavin Brown’s enterprise and Hauser & Wirth are presenting a major solo exhibition by noted Scottish artist and musician Martin Creed. Martin Creed will encompass the galleries’ venues downtown (Gavin Brown’s enterprise) and uptown (Hauser & Wirth), presenting new works as well as examples representing all three decades of the artist’s career to date. The exhibition will highlight Creed’s uncanny instinct for making a large impact through small interventions in the world around him, and his talent for exploiting existing objects and situations to elicit wonder. His deft use of the commonplace – colored masking tape, metronomes, potted plants and balloons are among the many at-hand materials of Creed’s oeuvre – is a strategy for expressing with great poignancy the limitations of art and the limitless magic of the universe beyond its reach. Creed has developed an artistic voice that is surprisingly expansive and emotional, calling to mind the English Romantic poets of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, who sought to capture the beauty in what William Wordsworth described as ‘the real language of men’. Creed’s 1996 ‘Work No. 143’, is a succinct mission statement that condenses his view: the whole world + the work = the whole world.

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

A curved wooden screen, ‘Work No. 1692’, is constructed from individual strips of timber from a vast array of different trees. Evocative of a formal room partition, this work functions as an object that provokes by decorating and concealing. Creed’s interest in visual patterning, explored through the diversity he finds in a single specific material, is also highlighted by ‘Work No. 1685’, which renders a tapestry from the naturally colored wool of different sheep. ‘Work No. 1696’ correlates with many of Creed’s projects involving steps, progressions, or increments, arising from Minimalist and Conceptual precepts. In the New York exhibition, a set of steps will be erected from stacked toilet paper rolls according to a pre-determined system. Similarly, the artist will also create new I-beam and brick sculptures, whose compositions are based upon mathematical ratios.

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Even when experimenting with the classical sculpture material of bronze, Creed continues to draw upon quotidian experiences in the manifestation of his art. A gold-plated bronze fist is based upon a sculpture the artist originally made as a schoolboy, while a wilted rose serves as inspiration for a near identical copy, enlarged in bronze. In Creed’s new walking film, the artist captures the movements of different individuals. His film will be projected as an installation in a tiled room created from grey acoustic foam panels and grey carpet tiles, a variation on Creed’s tiled series typified by the tiled floor he designed for the London restaurant Sketch. A new series of paintings will also be on display: Creed begins by painting a single brushstroke, each time doubling its width, until his last stroke can be painted with the use of a paint roller. Rendered on canvas, wood, and aluminum, the works on view in New York measure as some of the artist’s largest paintings to date. Outside the gallery of Gavin Brown, Creed will display a parked car with doors shut and engine off. At pre-determined moments the vehicle will come to life and every one of its mechanical processes will start simultaneously. Automatic doors and windows will open; the engine will start; air conditioning will blast as the horn blares; headlights and windshield wipers will flash on. Calling to mind the artist’s famous ‘Work No. 227 Lights going on and off’, presented at the Tate in London in 2001, this new piece continues Creed’s practice of taking gentle but surgically precise liberties with public space to ignite the audience’s imagination.

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise Copyright the artist Photography Thomas Müller

Martin Creed was born in Wakefield, England in 1958 and grew up in Glasgow. He lives and works in London and Alicudi, Italy. He has exhibited extensively worldwide, and in 2001 he won the Turner Price for ‘The lights going on and off’. Recent major solo exhibitions and projects include ‘Work No. 202’, National Gallery of Canada (2012); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago IL (2012); ‘Work No. 1059’, The Scotsman Steps, Edinburgh (2011); Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas TX (2011); ‘Things’, The Common Guild, Glasgow (2010); ‘Work No. 409’, Royal Festival Hall Elevator, London (2010); ‘Work No. 245’, Centre Pompidou-Metz (2009); Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Japan (2009); and the Duveen Commission, Tate Britain, London (2008). From 5 to 27 November 2013, there will be a solo exhibition of Creed’s work at The Warhol, Pittsburgh PA.

Gavin Brown’s Enterprise

Graphset – Replica

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Replica is a series of 8 portraits shot on Impossible film with the Instant Lab. As the first exhibition of its kind, Replica combines 3D computer-generated imagery with instant film, exploring relations between virtuality and reality. «In this series, I wanted to do the opposite of classic portrait photography which is always about capturing the moment, the instant of truth. Here, the model is at first shot at 360°. The set of images I get is then compiled to create a 3D model of the subject, transfering it to the virtual world. The model can then be edited : deformed, textured, enhanced. Light, focus and positionning are also decided during this digital step. Once the image is complete, it is exposed on Impossible film through the Instant Lab.» Trompe-l’oeil images result of this blend of two antinomic technologies : the misleading digital meeting the irrefutable analogue.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

«With Replica, the computer generated 3D image isn’t trying to convince the viewer of it’s veracity. On the contrary, it plays upon aesthetic codes of digital glitches and exposes itself as the result of a digital manipulation. It is the «printing» of these images on instant film that gives this hybrid work all of its tension.»

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Mikkael Doczekalski lives in Paris and works as Graphset since 2007. Graphset covers an extended range of graphic design: from printed objects, to motion design, via volume and stage design. His productions result of an atypical academic and professional background. Trained, at first, to automation techniques, he started his career in industrial robotics. He therefore developed a special graphical logic and method that he blended into his creative works, when entering the Ecole Nationale Superieur d’Art de Paris/Cergy in 2002. His experience in motion design started in 2009 through vj-ing and his participation to various european festivals (Nuits Sonores/fr, Mapping Festival/ch, …). This field of activity expanded to artistic collaborations, in 2010 with the musician Pixel (Raster Noton) who he created a dedicated visual set for, and in 2011 with dj & producer Max Cooper for the production of the track Echoes Reality’s music video. At the end of 2012, he produced a video piece for the Enghien les Bains Arts Center (Tomten), featuring music by Ben Frost, followed closely by the direction of a videoclip for the band Tahiti 80. These works, amongst others, define Graphset’s work as a constant exchange between graphic design and digital arts.

The Impossible Project

Graphset

Roni Horn – Everything was sleeping as if the universe were a mistake

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Hauser & Wirth just presented an exhibition comprising two new series of works by artist Roni Horn. Everything was sleeping as if the universe were a mistake fill the gallery’s West Chelsea space in Manhattan with two multi-part sculptures and large format drawings that continue Horn’s exploration of the nature of perception, memory, and identity. The experiential quality of Horn’s glass installations link the relationship of time to space and light. Employing the formal devices of pairing, repetition, and doubling, Horn challenges the viewer to reconcile the eye and the mind. Everything was sleeping as if the universe were a mistake will be on view through 11 January 2014.

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Upon entering the gallery’s soaring sky lit, wood-ceilinged space, viewers will encounter Untitled (“My name is Mary Katherine Blackwood. I am eighteen years old, and I live with my sister Constance. I have often thought that with any luck at all I could have been born a werewolf, because the two middle fingers on both my hands are the same length, but I have had to be content with what I had. I dislike washing myself, and dogs, and noise. I like my sister Constance, and Richard Plantagenet, and Amanita phalloides, the deathcup mushroom. Everyone else in my family is dead.”)’(2013), a sculpture comprised of ten cylindrical cast glass elements rendered in subtly shifting shades of chamomile, chartreuse, and lime and bathed in the glow of natural light. At the opposite end of the gallery, visitors will find Untitled (“A dream dreamt in a dreaming world is not really a dream … but a dream not dreamt is.”) (2013), a counterpart of the yellow and green glass sculpture but in hues of violet.

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Separated but palpably connected, the two sculptures invite comparison and contemplation of accepted notions of ‘likeness’ and ‘difference’. Reflecting the changing natural light from apertures in the ceiling above, Horn’s sculptures partner with the weather and the constant cycles of time to manifest her binary experimentations with color, weight, and lightness, and solidity and fluidity.

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

In the gallery’s central space, visitors will find a room containing Horn’s new series of large-scale drawings. This group of works exudes a powerful physical presence, abetted by its resolute color and handling of form. A meandering line roams freely across the surfaces of these drawings, suggesting an outline and relating this new work indirectly to Horn’s recurring theme of landscape. Here the artist manages to achieve both exquisite complexity and a masterful reduction of forms. The element of drawing has been an integral part of Roni Horn’s artistic practice for thirty years. She has said, ‘If you were to ask me what I do, I would say I draw – this is the primary activity and that all my work has this in common regardless of idiom or material’. Presented in juxtaposition with Horn’s sculptures, these wall-mounted works traverse boundaries between two and three dimensions to challenge conventional definitions of ‘drawing’. Rendered as identifiable geometric forms and abstract volumes in both sculpture and drawing, Horn’s art engages new means to push forth investigations of multiplicity and perception.

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth

Roni Horn was born in 1955 and lives and works in New York. Recent major solo exhibitions include ‘Selected Drawings 1984 – 2012’, Hauser & Wirth Zürich, Switzerland (2012); ‘Photographien / Photographic Works’, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg, Germany (2011); and ‘Well and Truly’, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2010). In November 2009, Horn’s comprehensive survey exhibition, ‘Roni Horn aka Roni Horn’ opened at Tate Modern and travelled to Collection Lambert in Avignon, France (2009); the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York NY (2009); and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston MA (2010). Horn’s works are featured in numerous major international institutions and collections including the Guggenheim Museum, New York NY; Museum of Modern Art, New York NY; The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago IL; Tate Modern, London, England; Kunsthalle Hamburg, Germany; Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland; and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. For Horn, 2013 has amounted to an important year. In January 2013, Horn was awarded the Joan Miró Prize and JRP Ringier also published the first major publication to focus solely on Horn’s extensive drawing practice. Running concurrently with her show at Hauser & Wirth, Horn will present a solo exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt am Main, Germany on view from 12 December 2013 to 26 January 2014. Following in 2014, Horn will participate in the 19th edition of the Sydney Australia Biennale, ‘You Imagine What You Desire’.

Hauser & Wirth

Jeune Création – 64th edition

Aude Fourel : Tais-toi Cassandre, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Aude Fourel : Tais-toi Cassandre, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Jeune Création, an international exhibition of contemporary art, presents its new selection from 9 to 17 November in the Écuries of CENTQUATRE. The 56 new projects by young artists are articulated around a rich and experimental artistic programme at the crossroads of genres and formats. This 64th edition, under the wing of artist Renaud Auguste-Dormeuil, continues to provide a key opportunity for discovering and exploring new art, both for professionals and the general public.

Linda Hofvander : Farewell, 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

Linda Hofvander : Farewell, 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected artists:

Louis Baguenault / Yoan Beliard / Yasmina Benabderrahmane / Allison Blumenthal / Edith Bories / Rémy Briere / Emilie Brout & Maxime Marion / Romain Cattenoz / Florian Cochet / Claire Colin-Collin / Valérie Collart / Pierre Daniel / Margaret Dearing / Jérémie Delhome / Julien des Monstiers / Antoine Desailly / Marcel Devillers / Iris Dittler / Ginger Dorigo / Thomas Durel / Emmanuelle Duron-Moreels / Guillaume Durrieu / Aude Fourel / Aurélien Grèzes / Nadja Groux / Tarik Hayward / Katrin Heichel / Pauline Hisbacq / Linda Hofvander / Franziska Holstein / Han Ji Hee / Carine Klonowski / Elizaveta Konovalova / Nicolas Lafon / Béranger Laymond / Guillaume Lebelle / Arnaud Lesage / Carmen Loch / Lucie & Simon / Constance Nouvel / Aurélie Pétrel / Samuel Paugam / East Eric / Manon Recordon / Pia Rondé / Julie Sas / Lei Saito / Julien Saudubray / Marine Semeria / Kevin Senant / Julien Tardieu / Anna Tomaszewski / Rémi Uchéda / Ana Vaz / Sergio Verastegui / Cyril Zarcone.

Julien des Monstiers : Grand Marbre, 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

Julien des Monstiers : Grand Marbre, 2013. Courtesy of the artist.

Awarded artists:
JEUNE CRÉATION-SYMEV PRIZE: Sergio Verastegui
BOESNER PRIZE : Elizaveta Konovalova
RESIDENCY SAO JOAO, BRAZIL : Louis Baguenault
LE COUP DE COEUR D’ART OSAKA, JAPAN : Lucie & Simon

Pierre Daniel : Finistère (S. Plath), 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Pierre Daniel : Finistère (S. Plath), 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Jeune Création at CENTQUATRE, Paris
November 9 – 17, 2013

Jeune Création