Anywhere, Anywhere Out of the World

Philippe Parreno, "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World", Palais de Tokyo, 2013. Philippe Parreno, The Writer, 2007.

Philippe Parreno, “Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World”, Palais de Tokyo, 2013.
Philippe Parreno, The Writer, 2007.

Philippe Parreno, one of the most original figures of the international art world, has radically transformed the monumental space of the Palais de Tokyo. In response to its carte blanche invitation, Parreno has devised an exhibition driven by his dialogue with architecture and with the notion of the exhibition as a medium in its own right. Anywhere, Anywhere Out of the World celebrates an artist whose works, ideas, and approach exercise considerable influence and have irrefutably reshaped our idea of art.

Philippe Parreno, "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World", Palais de Tokyo, 2013. Philippe Parreno, The Writer, 2007.

Philippe Parreno, “Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World”, Palais de Tokyo, 2013.
Philippe Parreno, The Writer, 2007.

Philippe Parreno orchestrates his exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo along the lines of a dramatic composition where the spectral presence of objects, music, lights, and films guide and manipulate the visitor’s experience, offering a journey through his works, both old and new, transforming this monologue into a polyphony. Philippe Parreno plays with symbols, words, and sounds, to alter the visitor’s perception of the space. His meticulously mastered script metamorphoses the building itself into a quasi-living, perpetually evolving organism, into an automaton.

Philippe Parreno, "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World", Palais de Tokyo, 2013. Philippe Parreno, Zidane : un portrait du XXIème siècle, 2006. © Philippe Parreno, Douglas Gordon.

Philippe Parreno, “Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World”, Palais de Tokyo, 2013.
Philippe Parreno, Zidane : un portrait du XXIème siècle, 2006. © Philippe Parreno, Douglas Gordon.

Since the 1990s, Philippe Parreno’s reputation has been built on his work’s originality and on the diversity and variety of his practice, including film, sculpture, performance, drawing, and writing. He views the exhibition as a medium, an object in its own right, an experience whose every possibility he seeks to explore.

The Palais de Tokyo is one of the few spaces in which such an experience of these epic proportions experience can occur. Parreno will be the first artist invited to occupy the entirety of the Palais de Tokyo’s expanded space of 22,000 square metres.

Philippe Parreno, "Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World", Palais de Tokyo, 2013. Installation Petrouchka, Stranvinski, recorded by Mikhail Rudy on a "Disklavier" Yamaha piano, 2013.

Philippe Parreno, “Anywhere, Anywhere, Out Of The World”, Palais de Tokyo, 2013.
Installation Petrouchka, Stranvinski, recorded by Mikhail Rudy on a “Disklavier” Yamaha piano, 2013.

Philippe Parreno is a French artist and filmmaker who lives and works in Paris, France.

Palais de Tokyo

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Journal of Bouba/kiki

Three Folds and Multiple Twists 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Three Folds and Multiple Twists 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Glasgow Sculpture Studios (GSS) is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work, Journal of Bouba/kiki, by Korean artist Haegue Yang, borne out of a three-month production residency that the artist undertook at GSS from June until September 2013.

The artist’s long-standing interests in the economy of labour, fabrication, movement, handicraft and abstraction have a continued presence in this exhibition. Examining what ‘production’ means in terms of an artist’s practice today, Yang brings together a variety of working methods. Her works range from complex installations using high-end fabrication with industrially produced and commercially available products, to hand-made sculptures and objects using traditional handicraft techniques. The handicraft pieces made from craft techniques such as knitting, paper making, origami and macramé are typically considered to be amateur, quotidian and less labour intensive, when compared to the conceptual and technologically advanced processes involved with her larger installations. This apparent opposition could be read as dialectic however, Yang sees them as a complementary combination. Yang is an artist that continuously pushes the boundaries of her practice engaging with new methodologies and ways of making. Using the idea of a ‘production’ residency as a challenge to her own efficiency, where she is away from her usual safe environment of the studio, the artist has embraced GSS’ extensive range of processes and facilities for working to create an exciting and dynamic new body of work.

Three Folds and Multiple Twists 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Three Folds and Multiple Twists 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

The exhibition brings together four new projects by Yang, developed entirely at GSS, with one pre-existing work that was produced during another production residency undertaken by the artist at Singapore Tyler Print Institute (STPI), Singapore in November 2012. A major new venetian blind installation, Three Folds and Multiple Twists 2013, forms the central part of her presentation. Yang’s interest in blinds stem in part from their limited function – they are made to simply conceal and to reveal – and yet she continually finds new ways to experiment with their configuration. In this installation a number of the lower blinds subtly twist in accordance with a choreographed programme. This presents a sensory experience for the viewer, as their perspective is altered as they encounter the work from various positions within the gallery. These twisting blinds further develops Yang’s interest in the mechanical movement of blinds, which was first seen in her major installation Approaching: Choreography Engineered in Never-Past Tense2012 at last year’s dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany. At GSS however, the movement is minimal, delicate and intimate, reflecting upon the environment of the white gallery space as opposed to a hard-edged industrial setting. The title of the work, Three Folds and Multiple Twists, reflects the configuration in the space as the installation wraps around three columns of the main exhibition space.

Floating Knowledge and Growing Craft - Silient Architecture Under Construction 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Floating Knowledge and Growing Craft – Silient Architecture Under Construction 2013 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Floating Knowledge and Growing Craft – Silent Architecture Under Construction 2013, is a two-part sculpture made using the traditional handicraft of macramé, and is a new departure for Yang. Accompanied with an iPod that plays a number of pod-casts, radio station and audio files that the artist listened to while she was making the work. The pod-casts are varied, and offer the audience a glimpse of the artist’s interest and passion for learning and knowledge, which in turn reveals a real insight into both the length of time taken and the labour-intensive process that the artist has placed into this macramé sculpture. Spice Sheets 2012 are a set of twenty prints produced at STPI, Singapore. Here the artist learnt methods of paper and print making. Their presence in this exhibition echoes the nature of hand-made production, which is witnessed in the macramé, and is an inherent theme of the exhibition.

A series of ceramic hands cast from life welcome the viewer to the exhibition. Sited at the entrance to the gallery and displayed on plinths and shelves that have been carved into the gallery wall, the work, entitled Two Ends of One 2013,could be seen as being a particularly pertinent introduction to both the show and Yang’s overarching interests. The individual sculptures depict a variety of hand gestures created by the artist to illustrate a connection or pairing between two ends of our body, namely fingers. It is in this work that Yang appears to separate and freeze in motion the act of labour, presenting us with a still life that captures the act of making in its most raw and simplified form. The work is motionless yet loaded with activity at the same time, the multiple poses arranged as if mid-way through a performance, unfolding a narrative of connected-ness.

Spice Sheets 2012 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

Spice Sheets 2012 Haegue Yang © Keith Hunter

The final work in the exhibition, Glasgow Tales of the Laugh 2013, consists of ten panels, which brings together a number of complex ideas. Taking photographs of public places in Glasgow, Yang explored different types of cultivated space, namely the Botanic Gardens and the Necropolis. These images are then married with text taken directly from Victor Hugo’s novel The Man Who Laughs first published in 1869, and written while the author was living on the Channel Islands during his exile from his native France.

Throughout the exhibition there is a consistent exploration of the dualities of the industrial and the domestic, technical and low-fi, organic and manual, all undertaken with a contemplative tone. The works created at GSS demonstrate the artist’s depth of material, yet also a persistent concern with, as the artist herself says, ‘desperate experimentation’.

Haegue Yang (Born 1971, Seoul, Korea; currently lives and works in Berlin and Seoul). Yang’s solo exhibitions have been held at renowned institutions such as Kunsthaus Bregenz, Modern Art Oxford, and Aspen Art Museum, to name but a few. Yang’s work has been shown extensively in biennales and notable group exhibitions. Amongst them are: Manifesta 4 (2002) in Frankfurt am Main, the 27th São Paulo Biennial (2006), If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution (2006 and 2007, different venues), Wessen Geschichte at the Kunstverein Hamburg (2008), the 55th Carnegie International in Pittsburgh (2008), or Abstract Possible: The Stockholm Synergies at the Tensta Konsthall in Stockholm (2012).

Glasgow Sculpture Studios

Robert Heinecken – Sensing the technologic banzai

© Robert Heinecken

© Robert Heinecken

Heinecken’s “Waking Up in News America” is a significant work that has not been seen in almost two decades. The room-sized installation investigates two of Heinecken’s deep concerns: mass media and the affects of one particular form of mass media–the television. “Waking Up in News America” is a room in which every surface–the walls and floors, the figure sitting in a chair and the range of household objects that make up this odd ‘domestic’ environment–are completely covered in images shot from the TV. The effect is to suggest that we are formed–in every way–by the omnipresent medium.

© Robert Heinecken

© Robert Heinecken

Trained as a graphic designer and printmaker, Heinecken was long interested in how our sense of self is shaped by news, pornography and advertising, and considered both broadcast and print media throughout his career. For Heinecken, as the saying goes, “we are what we eat.” In works going back to the mid-60s, Heinecken’s combinations and manipulations of found images and text serve as an important link between historical Surrealism and later Appropriation. But it was in the late 1970s, after a series of major events in his life–including a fire that destroyed his studio in 1976–that Heinecken charts an important new course, injecting his own subjectivity as a thing to be dealt with, purposefully blurring the lines between who he was and who he was assumed to be by the mass media messages that surround us all and make up so much of American visual life.

© Robert Heinecken

© Robert Heinecken

In the late 70s, Heinecken began experimenting with texts that he either wrote himself or adapted using the language, format and mode of address found in magazine articles and talk television. Initially the images, taken with a Polaroid SX-70, were pictures of Heinecken, his friends and his immediate environment. Later pieces paired texts with images from magazine pages and collaged images from magazine pages. For a series of works entitled “Socio/Fashio Lingerie” (1981), Heinecken presents pairings of magazine collages with lingerie advertising blurbs, often accompanied by a handwritten-text that regurgitates much of the lascivious text of the lingerie blurb. At first, this seemingly handwritten and lascivious text is assumed to be Heinecken’s own thoughts. It is only on closer inspection that it reveals to be almost entirely derived from the advertising copy.

© Robert Heinecken

© Robert Heinecken

As critic Matt Biro writes, “This sort of scripting of experience was being carried out on a much larger scale in the world of television, where the consumer fantasies of corporate broadcasting were irrevocably inserted into the intimate domestic settings of the home.” (Matt Biro, “Reality Effects,” Artforum, October 2011, p. 255). The text of “Waking Up in News America” presents the viewer as if at the dawn of a new era formed by image and technology: “Waking up in News America with mostly blue eyed blondes. Pretending another Occidental sunrise. Sensing the technologic banzai.” “Waking Up in News America” (1986) is a quintessential 80s piece, a statement on the intrusiveness of television, its fantasies and consumerism, all driven by the psychological power of the medium’s ability to blend language and image.

© Robert Heinecken

© Robert Heinecken

Also included in Cherry and Martin’s exhibition will be a number of Heinecken’s videograms. To make these concrete photographic works, Heinecken held unexposed photo paper up to the television set, turning it on and off to expose the image. For Heinecken, the motif of the TV network newswoman is a favorite narrative foil who seemingly legitimates the madness of the media world. Cherry and Martin’s exhibition will also include a selection of Heinecken’s magazine print-throughs from the late 80s and early 90s, in which two sides of a magazine page are reproduced as one image, bringing out unexpected associations and meanings.

Cherry and Martin

The Suicide Paintings – Rob Pruitt

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Massimo De Carlo gallery in London inaugurates its new season with The Suicide Paintings by American artist Rob Pruitt. Pruitt in his third show at Massimo De Carlo presents new paintings that explore infinite space and blankness, purity and pollution, and optimism and desperation. The work in the show represents a culmination of previous bodies of work, from his fountains to face paintings.  While so much of Pruitt’s previous work has dealt with cultural subject matter, in this new body of work, content has been drained, leaving only a psychological and emotional residue.

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Spread around the exhibition are a number of chromed TV Sets: having become useless as means of information and entertainment, replaced by flat screen TVs, these objects from the 80s and the 90s survive through their shape, reconstructed with a glamorous and glittery patina. Even this body of works refers to the classics: these TV sets deliver a strong sense of nostalgia.

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

These new sculptures are standing on hundreds and hundreds of black and white cubes. Part sculptures themselves, and part plinths for the other works in the show, these cubes are configuring a new modular system of exhibiting Rob Pruitt’s sculptures through a new radical, pixelated signature pedestal. These cubes can even take the form of a new floor for one of the rooms in the basement of the gallery, as if Carl Andre had suddenly turned digital.

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

Courtesy of Massimo De Carlo Gallery

In the new paintings, two gradient fields of colour are juxtaposed, creating a picture within a frame.  The images suggest both heavenly and hellish vistas, evoking everything from the clouds in a Botticelli painting to the screensaver on an iPad. While the gradient fields suggest depictions of space and the changing times of day, they are also a visual metaphor for transitioning psychological states.

Massimo De Carlo London 

Pierre Huyghe

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

The Centre Pompidou presents the first retrospective exhibition of the work of Pierre Huyghe, a major figure in the contemporary art scene both in France and internationally. The exhibition of approximately fifty projects adopts a completely new approach to the artist’s work, and provides a comprehensive panorama of his practice and research which spread over the past twenty years. The show aims to emphasize the live and organic dimension of the artist’s propositions, where the exhibition space is conceived as a world in itself, not orchestrated, but living at its own pace.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Pierre Huyghe was, from the Nineties onwards, a key figure in redefining the status of the art work and the exhibition format, sometimes joining them in the form of a diary, a journey to the Antarctic or an annual calendar in the shape of a garden..

While presenting some of his most iconic works, such as Blanche Neige Lucie, No Ghost Just a Shell and Streamside Day, the exhibition explores the recurrences and junctions that appear in certain works, and shows how the artist seeks to invent «live situations» through which he strives to intensify the presence and vitality of reality.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

«I am interested in constructing situations that take place within reality […] I focus on something that is not played, but which exists in itself. I seek not to identify the relationship between subjects, but to invent initial conditions that lead to permeability. What interests me is intensifying a presence, giving it its own presentation, its own appearance and its own life, rather than subjecting it to pre-established models.» Pierre Huyghe

Thus, for The Host and the Cloud, Pierre Huyghe summoned a number of witnesses to the deserted Museum of Traditional Arts and Crafts to discover a number of events which took place during Halloween, Valentines’ Day and Labour Day. He staged different situations such as a trial, hypnosis sessions, choreographies and sexual acts. For Documenta 13 in Kassel, visitors accidentally discovered his site, a built ecosystem where one could find a dog with a pink leg, an uprooted oak of Joseph Beuys and a sculpture of a reclining naked woman whose head was obscured by a beehive. The exhibition space in the South Gallery opens to the outer world as an outgrowth, where certain organic and climatic works by the artist will exist.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

With the artist’s participation, this presentation represents a stage in this singular body of work – a first step towards a future permanent site of Pierre Huyghe’s concerns and obsessions, based on the idea of constructing a self-generating world which varies in time and space, indifferent to our presence.

The exhibition will travel to the Ludwig Museum of Cologne from April 11th to July 13th 2014 and to LACMA in Los Angeles from November 23rd 2014 to March 8th 2015.

Pierre Huyghe at Centre Pompidou

Keren Cytter – Mop Vengeance

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

Pilar Corrias is pleased to present MOP VENGEANCE, Keren Cytter’s third solo exhibition with the gallery that brings together two new bodies of work. Keren Cytter captures and explores human relationships, particularly the performed behaviours and interactions of everyday life. Working with narrative, Cytter plays with humorous, absurd, and deconstructed dialogues, which at times mix fictitious situations with real-life. Typically her work has manifested into video and staged performances where conventions from literature, television, film, and theatre are all used and then unravelled, creating very particular, and unconventional, narrative structures. Reality and artifice are continually blurred, due to the fact that she uses her own life, and that of her friends, as a primary source of inspiration.

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

For Vengeance, a seven-part video narrative epic, Cytter takes her own currently changing life situation as inspiration. Having recently moved to New York, Cytter adopted the US TV-platform of the ‘daily soap’ as a structural format to processes classic themes of drama in personal relationships: love, envy, betrayal, and vengeance. Cytter’s characters perform exaggerated scenes of soap genre clichés, such as cheating on partners, and professions of love. Unlike her older series of video works and their intimate settings, the scenes in Vengeance were filmed at 15 different places around Staten Island and New Jersey, including restaurants, hotels, parks, apartments, and streets. A total of 50 actors, most of them professionals, fulfill their social functions with blank faces. They provide a projection space for the beliefs and stereotypes of each viewer.

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

Courtesy of Pilar Corrias

Museum of Photography (MOP) is a large archive of Polaroid photographs that document Cytter’s life as she travelled from Berlin, to London, to the USA, and Israel from 2012 to 2013. Taken with her 1200i and One step 600 Polaroid Camera, the photographs are carefully categorised by geography and chronology and then arranged into sub-sections, titled A, B, C and D and so on, via their aesthetic. Images of friends, colleagues, curators she has encountered, museums she has worked in, landscapes she is passing through, and her own performances are all featured. Although lacking in a script, MOP has a similar dependence on image structure to her previous works, where she visually constructs a disrupted, and hence confused narrative. A form of self-portrait, acting as a visual diary, Cytter also bestows another type of performed structure on to the project by referencing ‘Museum’ in the series’ title.

Pilar Corrias 

Young London 2013

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

Young London 2013 presents both new and recent works, with many commissions and site-specific works produced especially for this exhibition, and offers an eclectic and detailed exploration of the imperatives and artistic practices that resonate today. The third instalment in the Young London series, Young London 2013 continues V22’s plan for an annual selection of London’s most talented and exciting emerging artists. In iterating this survey each year, Young London provides an opportunity to observe a range of trends set by a new generation of artists that go on to influence and shape the future of contemporary art in London, nationally and internationally.

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

In this way, Young London makes a vital contribution not only to the promulgation of London’s fine art zeitgeist, but also to its assessment and critique.Young London provides a unique platform for emerging artists to show their work alongside a wide group of their contemporaries in a large-scale exhibition. Previous Young London artists have gone on to produce exciting new commissions and presentations, have been offered representation by leading contemporary galleries, and many have become part of the V22 Collection.

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

The V22 Collection is collectively owned by artists and investor-patrons, and is listed on the stock market as an innovative and exciting way for many people to share a growing collection of contemporary art. This structure aims to enable artists to retain a stake in the future of their artworks and have more direct input into the wider art ecology.

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

A multi-disciplinary show, Young London 2013 includes performance, video, film, vlogs, sculpture, installation and painting and takes place in V22’s impressive 50,000 sq ft exhibition space in Bermondsey. The exhibition also presents Young London Friday Lates, a series of weekly events taking place after-hours, providing artists with a more intimate environment in which to present further aspects of their work and for visitors and artists to exchange ideas.

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

This year V22 is providing a new opportunity for an artist-in-residence at neighbouring Coleman Projects in Bermondsey. An off-site Young London project, this residency provides a contained space to build a site-specific installation or project. This year Ben Sansbury will be the artist-in-residence and the show will open in conjunction with the Young London 2013 Preview on Saturday 14 September.

Courtesy of V22

Courtesy of V22

Young London artists were selected from nominations received through V22’s existing network, including artists from the collection, industry professionals, academics, young curators, and the Young London alumni. We would like to thank curators David Thorp and Paul Pieroni, and artist Rebecca Warren for assisting V22 in the final selection of artists.

V22