Gianni Caravaggio

© Gianni Caravaggio

Photo: Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Every artwork in its own essence (when it has one), is a proposition for a new world. This proposition is essentially the artistic gesture given to the observer. In reality, this gesture already belongs to the observer. As if, at the moment it is given, the observer unconsciously remembers it. The observer in this case doesn’t make use of the artwork in a traditional sense, he doesn’t read it, he doesn’t consume it, but computes a demiurgic act in initiating it. “The image is what lets itself begin, all the rest is lost to our imagination,” thus affirmed Jean Baudrillard, in one of his last lectures, surpassing his apocalyptic vision of the postmodern world of media and the mediated.

© Gianni Caravaggio

Photo Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

The physical experience and the imaginative evocation are the beginning of the image, intended as an imaginative initiation. I describe a demiurgic act, as precisely this imaginative initiation, with this I mean an image that is essentially performative. It may seem strange, but for me this image has a preordained moral sense.

This “Beginning” presents itself with an undeniable and unmistakable concreteness, to the point that it lead me to think of it as “truth.” The question of “truth” brings with it a moral value and responsibility: this is the beginning of an immanent morality. And it is the inaugural image that, with its truth, brings a moral sense. The five propositions for a new world (which allude, with gratitude, to Italo Calvino’s Lezioni Americane) each crystallize an image that allows itself to begin, which is precisely what distinguishes the new world from the old one.

© Gianni Caravaggio

Photo Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Sotto la superficie, la verità della concretezza (Under the surface, the truth of concreteness). To go under the surface, a deep reaching gesture of rupture (of vision, of thought) is necessary, as is the surface itself, or the superficiality, which veils this depth. Within this paradox of surface/appearance and depth/concreteness bare experience is established. This dichotomy constitutes a poetic act. Taken separately, the first – the surface – becomes a chimera and the other – the concreteness – is reduced to mere aesthetic taste. On the other hand, a synthesis between these two poles suggests that the profanation of mediated perception bears the onset of experience. And here it is: a wedge of Bardiglio marble tearing an ink jet print photograph of the sky that I took some times ago while crossing the Alps.

Alpha e Omega (Alpha and Omega). Freed from being a purely functional act, the work becomes a concrete symbol of time. The time of the beginning and the time of the end, divided from their becoming. The becoming is the finished work that, from the same entity, creates two different bodies, with two different sensibilites, two different lights. A roughly cut piece of a seasoned beechwood defines a triangle shape of the A of Alpha, and the gesture of sanding and polishing the curved surface of the cylinder of the same seasoned beechwood outlines the O of Omega. Alpha and Omega are separated, but at the same time united by the path that embellishes: the work.

© Gianni Caravaggio

Photo Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Piegarsi per il proprio peso (Bending for one’s own weight). To be astonished by things, not just by their effects, but to physically feel them, signifies the constitution of their causes and to invest oneself in a true responsibility. To feel the bending of a piece of paper as if it was one’s own body does not just indicate an effect, but it also inaugurates the cause, an artistic act. It is the moving body of the artist, incarnated by a graphite drawing, that weighs on the paper, creating a gravitational force. This imaginative synthesis between cause and effect becomes a concrete allegory for the artistic act and, at the same time, in the words of Kierkegaard, “a leap which exceeds doubt.”

Il mistero nascosto da una nuvola (The mystery hidden by a cloud). The act of being veiled has always characterized the nature of mystery, that is to say, something that lives in the abyss of our imagination, not totally understood. The vision of mystery manifests itself in an obscurely open fashion, and for this reason, it is continuously vital. On the other hand, it is in this act of veiling itself, like the veiling on a chocolate cake with powdered sugar, that the mystery manifests itself. It manifests concretely, like the moment in which a mountaintop pierces a cloud, or a face is hidden by a veil. Nature loves to hide itself – re-veil itself so to speak – it is precisely in hiding itself that it manifests as image – a paradox of logic. But here, I have the feeling that nature does not ask us for comprehension, but instead welcomes us, a relaxedness in which we allow ourselves to begin from that which appears as mystery.

© Gianni Caravaggio

Photo: Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Iniziare un tempo (Begin a time). The time of the apparition of a figure is distinguished and separates that which was before its unveiling. In its apparition, the figure begins its own time, like the comet that launched beginning of the western time. A previous work titled Cause (Causes) 2004 is the origin of this work, for which I now decided to keep the casting tubes and part of the earth that covered the cast itself, just enough for the figure to unveil and articulate itself. It seemed strange to me the way in which that icon, rooted in our memory, solidifies in the material like the abyss of our unconscious, the figure, unveiling itself, each time giving a decisive face. This decided face of being outside of time, of eternity, from our abyss, enters in our familiar space and begins a new time, much like a comet does.

In the end, in what does this morality consist?
You will know when it is born within you, as it was born in me.

Gianni Caravaggio
June, 2013

Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Photo: Giovanna Pavesi Courtesy of Gianni Caravaggio and Kaufmann Repetto

Gianni Caravaggio – Cinque proposizioni per un mondo nuovo (Five propositions for a new world) at Kaufmann Repetto, September 16 – November 11, 2013.

Gianni Caravaggio

Kaufmann Repetto

Advertisements

Richard Tuttle – Matter

© Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle is one of the most singular and influential artists working today, whose extraordinary work eludes classification and dissolves the boundaries of sculpture, painting, drawing, installation and printmaking. Since his first exhibition in New York in 1965, Richard Tuttle has employed the strongest of soft touches on a groundbreaking exploration into the poetry of form, color, line and the material. He has consistently expanded our understanding of the art object’s relationship to space and subtly redefined our expectations of sculpture.

© Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

Tuttle masterfully employs ephemeral and fragile materials in the construction of a personal lexicon where cardboard, wire, wood, paper and cloth perform as words in a poem or notes in a score, characterized by a resolute absence of reference or interpretation: “To make something which looks like itself is, therefore, the problem, the solution. To make something which is unraveling, its own justification is something like a dream. There is no paradox, for that is only a separation from reality. We have no mind, only its dream of being, a dream of substance when there is one” .

 © Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

Matter will be Richard Tuttle’s first solo exhibition in Paris since 2001, and will feature two new series of wall works. The series «The Place In The Window, II »was made while the artist was in residence at the Getty Research Center in Los Angeles from September 2012 through June 2013. Each work consists of cotton pulp that has been dyed and fixed to a shaped matrix of wire mesh, installed on the wall at precise heights. The second series of works is entitled « An Other Set of Shoes ».

© Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle was born in New Jersey, USA in 1941 and currently lives in New York and Abiquiu, New Mexico. His first major museum exhibition in 1975 was covering his first ten years of work organized by the Whitney Museum in New York. Tuttle has since been the subject of museum exhibitions around the world, and included in three Documenta and three Whitney Biennial exhibitions.

© Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

In 2005 a major retrospective of Tuttle’s work was organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art which traveled to five institutions including the Whitney Museum in New York and the Museums of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Los Angeles. The exhibition was accompanied by an impressive illustrated monograph documenting forty years of his artistic practice.In France, his work has been shown at the Paris Museum of Modern Art (l’ARC), the CAPC in Bordeaux, the Carré d’Art in Nîmes and more recently in 2006 at the Frac Auvergne, Frac Haute-Normandie and Domaine de Kerguéhennec.

© Richard Tuttle

© Richard Tuttle

Galerie Marian Goodman

Another – Pier Paolo Calzolari

Untitled (I and my five fish-hooks in the corner of my real real sermon) 1970

© Pier Paolo Calzolari

An emblematic figure in the Italian contemporary art scene and part of the Arte Povera movement, since the 1960s Pier Paolo Calzolari has developed an unusual oeuvre based on the use of certain recurring materials: tobacco leaves, salt, fire, frost, copper and lead. They play a role in a very personal universe distinguished by a hermetic and alchemical poetry, where each material is subject to transformations, but also causes them. Salt and ice conserve, but sometimes they can also burn like fire. And frost, produced by ancient fridge motors, enveloping sheets of metal like a virus, evokes the whiteness of Venetian marble reflecting the midday sun.

Untitled (Iron pall - Tealighs - Copper pall) 1989-1990. II

© Pier Paolo Calzolari

The art of Pier Paolo Calzolari is inspired by a Franciscan vision of the world, which seeks to establish an equal relationship between beings (be they human or animal). So much so that effects of horizontality have become hallmarks of his work, reminiscent for some of a theatre stage. In a Calzolari exhibition, each work competes to establish the thread of a drama, dream or mystery (in the medieval sense of the word). This theatrical dimension unfolds in strange performances peopled with albino animals, but also with sculptures. Calzolari has often compared his work to a temple in which the sculptures were “never envisaged as a finished act […], but rather as different parts of an organism that spark a conversation”. This explains why each element of these exhibitions takes the form of a dreamlike ceremony – indeed, it is all about capturing a dream. “When the dreamer dies,” the artist asks himself, “what happens of the dream?”

My bed as it must be

© Pier Paolo Calzolari

For his first exhibition at galerie kamel mennour, Pier Paolo Calzolari makes use of both exhibition spaces: a collection of mostly older works are shown in the gallery on the rue Saint-André des arts, while the artist inaugurated the new space in the rue du Pont de Lodi with works that are largely recent.

Untitled (door) 2013

© Pier Paolo Calzolari

Born in 1943 in Bologna, Pier Paolo Calzolari lives and works in Fossombrone, Italy. His work has been shown in numerous solo exhibitions, including at: Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna di Ca’Pesaro (IT), Fondation Marguerite et Aimé Maeght (FR), Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume (FR), Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea (IT), Galleria Civica di Modena (IT), Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Villa delle Rose (IT), Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain of Nice (FR). Since 1967, he has also participated in major group exhibitions, such as: “Where are we going? Opere scelte dalla Collezione François Pinault,” Palazzo Grassi – François Pinault Foundation (IT), “Notations/Forms of Contingency: New York and Turin 1960/1970s,” Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (USA), “Zero to Infinity: Arte Povera 1962-1972.” His work is currently on view at Fondazione Prada, Venice (IT).

Camei, Esquisses

© Pier Paolo Calzolari

Galerie Kamel Mennour

Jan Dibbets

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Gladstone Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Jan Dibbets. Initially trained as a painter, in the 1960s Dibbets turned to photography, drawing on the rich tradition of Dutch painting, and its emphases on light, structure, and nature. Dibbets developed a painterly approach to photography, challenging the assumption that photography produces only objective reproductions of reality, and exploring the possibilities for a photograph as an art object. Dibbets went on to create photographic series such as “Perspective Corrections,” which explored the dichotomy between the illusion the camera creates and the reality that the eye sees, laying the foundation for what eventually became recognized as conceptual art. In the mid-seventies, Dibbets pushed the boundaries of the photographic medium even further, becoming the first artist to recognize large-scale color photography as a legitimate medium.

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

The exhibition on view at Gladstone Gallery will feature a recent series of Dibbets’ Colorstudies, large-scale works that depict detailed views of car hoods. The works have been created from Dibbets’ original materials from the 1970s, using modern technology and contemporary techniques to better achieve what Dibbets originally envisioned for the Colorstudies works. Interested in the way a close-cropped view of an object can obscure its representational value, Dibbets often takes as his subject scenes from the everyday, including landscapes, windows, and automobiles, using mundane subject matter to create new modes of perspective and understanding. Exploring the element of abstraction inherent in reality, the Colorstudies depict fragments of the natural landscape reflected in the cars’ hoods, highlighting the way familiar objects can become obscured by the camera’s gaze. Cast in glossy, bright hues, the works reflect Dibbets’ interest in manipulating color to further question the relationship between representation and reality.

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery

Jan Dibbets lives and works in Amsterdam. He has had solo exhibitions at major institutions, including: Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Miami Art Museum, Miami; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Detroit Institute of the Arts, Detroit; Fundacion Espai Poblenau, Barcelona; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Museum Haus Lange, Krefeld, Germany.

Gladstone Gallery

Prima 
Materia



©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

“Dialogue” is the key word of the exhibition Prima materia. First of all, the constant dialogue, during the preparation of the show, between Michael Govan and Caroline Bourgeois, entrust- ed by François Pinault to conceive this exhibition starting from his collection. The project was thus built little by little through exchange, from the confrontation between complementary choices and points of view: on one side Europe, on the other California; on the one hand a long term involvement in the history of the Pinault Collection and, on the other hand, a fresh look at it. Dialogue was also established by the curators between artists from different geographic and cultural backgrounds by confronting, in a fascinating way, art Povera and the Mono-ha move- ment that emerged in Japan in the same period. This idea of dialogue, confrontation, dialecti- cal tension between emptiness and fullness, noise and silence, materiality and evanescence, implies and structures the whole path of the exhibition.

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo


©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

Finally, dialogue was established between the works and their environment and represents a particularly crucial issue for any contemporary art institution. Prima materia questions the very premises of Punta della dogana, perhaps even more so than the previous exhibitions presented since it reopened in 2009. it offers the occasion to rethink the spaces, to modify the perception of them. ryan Trecartin and Lizzie Fitch transform the first great hall into an environment that mingles constructions, furniture, installation, and screening, proposing a unique and irreverent experience of this space, which had always been approached as a ma- jestic nave. in a reverse process, the exhibition allows to feel for the first time the monumen- tality of the second nave, which used to be separated into three distinct rooms but has now been reunited into one large space, from the Grand Canal to the Giudecca Canal.

© Marie-­Puck Broodthaers

© Marie-­Puck Broodthaers

Thanks to strong decisions such as the play of contrasts of rhythm or tone, the desire to dedi- cate to paintings the first floor, with its irregular surfaces of the brick walls, or the attention paid to works playing with light and sound, Prima materia vividly demonstrates the plasticity of Tadao ando’s architecture at Punta della dogana. Beyond its ability to adapt to different media or formats, it surprisingly offers an environment that renews and enriches the visitors’ perception of the works of art.

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo


©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

The quality of the relationship between art and architecture at Punta della dogana mostly relies on the artists’ strong presence during the process of conceiving and producing the ex- hibitions: they are invited to contribute to the choice of works, supervise or manage the in- stallation (which often leads them to entirely rethink the work for the location). They are also closely associated with the publishing and cultural programs of the institution. The decision to place the artist at the very heart of the artistic project culminates in the practice of com- missioning and producing new works of art. with works from Philippe Parreno, Zeng Fanzhi, Mark Grotjahn, Marlene dumas…, Prima materia reasserts the spirit that presides the project of Palazzo Grassi – Punta della dogana – Pinault Collection: a spirit of trust, commitment, and challenges. Martin Bethenod

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo


©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

Ubiquitous and graphic media images of war, protest, and social upheaval provided the back- drop for artistic breakthroughs of late 1960s, much of which was expressed in abstraction— sometimes emptiness. That era also opened new vistas on social equality and shared con- cerns, such as the condition and future of our environment. Today, science and technology offer social connectivity on a global scale, constantly available images of every kind, and the promise of technological solutions for longevity, and renewable energy. at the same time, we still live in an atmosphere of anxiety, often faced with invisible and abstract adversaries— among them, global warming and technological terrorism. we are immersed in a cacophony of media image and sound.

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo


©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

if the goal of most of nineteenth century art was truth through beauty and balance, the art of the late twentieth and our own century tends toward a coexistence of extremes—of abstrac- tion and surrealism, emptiness and chaos, negation and spectacle, high and low. artistically, we live in an age of global pluralism. Four basic elements of painting, sculpture, installation, and performance are all alchemized by the prima materia of media, not only the substance of film or video or the internet, but the means by which it is disseminated and discussed globally.

©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo


©
Palazzo
Grassi,
ORCH
orsenigo_chemollo

Medieval texts on alchemy suggest hundreds of diverse descriptions and definitions of the pri- ma materia, the prime matter—separate from, or encompassing, earth, air, fire, and water; or the formless base of all matter; containing the soul and the body, the sun and the moon; love and light, imagination and consciousness; or urine, blood, or dirt. it was searched for in the darkest soil of the forest, and inside the body. it is the primal chaos that exists before time and all possibilities of the future. western and Eastern, it is the Tao of Lao Tzu’s Tao te Ching; or, in science, perhaps the dark matter that makes up most of our universe. The definitions of this medium that carries all of the elements are diverse by cultural perspective or personal identity. Sometimes circularly represented as a serpent eating its tail, the prima materia—es- sence, everything and nothing, everywhere and nowhere—takes many forms. Caroline Bourgeois and Michael Govan

Punta della Dogana 

Paola Pivi – Ok, you are better than me, so what?

Galerie Perrotin inaugurated its New York space with the exhibition by the audacious and playful Italian artist Paola Pivi, “Ok, you are better than me, so what?”.

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Pivi creates artworks that are disorienting and simultaneously poetic. Though formally different, her work pushes the limit of what can be done in this world as an artwork. Her first comprehensive solo exhibition in the United States takes over both floors of the gallery and feature exclusive new works. On the ground floor, Pivi presents an installation of eight fantastic creatures. The polars bears return in Paola’s art! An unexpected performing sculpture, “Money machine (true blue, baby I love you)” is also on display on the lower level, evoking the topography of the New York building which was previously a bank and hosted a vault.

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Nomadic by nature, Paola Pivi has lived all over the world, including Shanghai, the remote island of Alicudi in southern Italy, and Anchorage, Alaska. She is presently in India. Pivi first exhibited at Viafarini in Milan in 1995, the same year she enrolled in the Brera Academy of Art in Milan. In 1999, she was co-awarded the Golden Lion for the best national pavilion (Italy) at Harald Szeemann’s Venice Biennial. For this venue, which featured five Italian artists, Pivi presented “Untitled (airplane)”, an inverted Fiat G-91 airplane resting on its cockpit.

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Last year, the artist was commissioned two original public artworks in New York City: “How I roll”, a project by Public Art Fund, a Piper Seneca airplane rotating on its wingtips, installed near Central Park at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, and “Untitled (zebras)”, a striking image of zebras on a snow-covered mountaintop on the 25-by-75-foot High Line Billboard at West 18th Street. Like all of her photographs, this image is a live-action still, presented without digital intervention. Another of her iconic photographs, “Untitled (donkey)”, shows a lonely donkey on a boat floating in the Mediterranean Sea. This solo show in New York will be Paola Pivi’s seventh exhibition with the gallery.

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Courtesy of Galerie Perrotin

Galerie Perrotin 

Methods – Julien Carretero

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

Methods exhibition, at Victor Hunt, Brussels, is presenting the groundbreaking French designer Julien Carretero’s recent explorations of metal in all it’s variations and their particular processes following his research of the past three years and resulting in an extended batch of recent works to be discovered, highlighting the essences of the material.

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

The exhibition will be representing the latest limited edition named Contrast, launched in June at Design Miami/ Basel, composed of six different designs in different metals emphasizing the contrasts inherent to all main alloy’s within the industrial world – all lighting, realised exclusively for Victor Hunt Designart Dealer.

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

ⓒ Laetitia Bica

Additionally there will be a particular attention for the recent Stencil edition – based upon the principles of renewable textile molds for aluminium casting of structures – supported by the documentary produced by Victor Hunt to enlighten the process of the project.

ⓒ Julien Carretero

ⓒ Julien Carretero

Last but not least, there will be an overview of all of the designer’s main projects since his graduation at Design Academy, such as his graduation To be Continued and Drag projects.

Victor Hunt Gallery 

Julien Carretero