Architectones – MAMO

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

Since 2012, Xavier Veilhan develops Architectones, a series of artistic interventions in key areas of modernist architecture. After three stages in Los Angeles (VDL Richard Neutra, CSH # 21 by Pierre Koenig and Sheats-Goldstein Residence by John Lautner), this exhibition is the fourth in a series that will continue in September at the Church of St. Bernadette du Banlay, Nevers, with Claude Parent and Paul Virilio.

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

On the terrace of the Cité Radieuse, the artist is exhibiting among other, rays, beams of lines defining a virtual plane between the vertical and horizontal roof of the Cité Radieuse, a bust of Le Corbusier, a structure hanging in the gymnasium, and many other elements.

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

Xavier Veilhan (1963) is a French artist who lives and works in Paris. His work includes photography, sculpture, film, painting and installations. Xavier Veilhan emerged in the early 1990s as one of the leading artists of his generation. A series of exhibitions, showcasing every aspect of his unique plastic vocabulary, ensured his international fame. In 2009, it was the consecration with his exhibition at Versailles, where the castle and its gardens offered an ideal setting for his sculptures and installations.

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 - Photo © diane arques

© Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2013/ © Fondation Le Corbusier / ADAGP, Paris, 2013 – Photo © diane arques

Architectones – Barcelona Pavilion

MAMO

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Lightness of Being

Daniel Buren - Suncatcher

Daniel Buren – Suncatcher

Lightness of Being features 11 artists whose works display a playful and irreverent attitude toward formal ideals of classical sculpture. Including new commissions and major works being shown in New York for the first time, the exhibition is at once lighthearted and engaging, incorporating a lively sense of play and wry humor. The international group of artists in the show includes Cristian Andersen, James Angus, Olaf Breuning, Daniel Buren, Evan Holloway, Alicja Kwade, Sarah Lucas, Ugo Rondinone, David Shrigley, Gary Webb, and Franz West.

© Daniel Buren

© Daniel Buren

Daniel Buren’s Suncatcher, a kaleidoscopic, pergola-like installation that casts colored light onto anything below it if the sun’s hitting it right, and Olaf Breuning’s The Humans, a humorous and lovable sextet of sculptures that roughly depict the artist’s view of human evolution, starting with a primordial blob of a person and ending with a kind of fat cat in a tux with a bronze tail. Just beyond is British artist Gary Webb’s Buzzing It Down, a totemic column of strikingly colored, gigantic shapes stacked one atop the other that is equal parts classic and totally new.

© Daniel Buren

© Daniel Buren

Kids will also get a kick out of Alicja Kwade’s circular bicycle, which looks as if a giant squeezed a ten-speed with its fist; Franz West’s Untitled, a set of colorful, upside-down works artfully placed on the lawn at the park’s northeastern end; and Sarah Lucas’s enormous concrete squashes, on which children are invited to play. What may startle young visitors most is the installation’s only performance art piece: Ugo Rondinone’s dog days are over, a (live) clown who does nothing but sit on bench and act in a most unclownly—read: morose—manner.

Time Out

A smile for you – Jeppe Hein

© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

Bonniers Konsthall is proud to present this year’s guest artist and the first major solo exhibition in Sweden with acclaimed artist Jeppe Hein. Danish artist Jeppe Hein’s installations and sculptures play with our sensory experiences and let the audience take an active role. When visitors approach what may seem to be a familiar thing, like a mirror, they encounter something unexpected. In Light Pavilion a person peddling on a stationary bicycle activates the unfolding of a bright trail of lights into a circus tent. In You everyone trying to look through a hole in the wall meets a reflection of his own eye.

© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

“I would like to think that happiness looks like that whale, that it’s always swimming around under the surface, and now and then it looks up and becomes visible.” Jeppe Hein’s work rests on a humble anti-hierarchical approach with an open door to Western art history as well as other traditions. Within his work, Hein makes references to minimalism and its use of industrial materials and space, as well as the importance of the viewer for completion of the work. In this exhibition, there are also clear influences of Eastern culture, such as meditation, yoga and Zen Buddhism, which are apparent in the new works Hein has created specifically for the gallery. Visitors entering the gallery will release hanging balls that run a dynamic track passing different singing bowls that start to sound whenever a ball touches them, thus creating a vibrating soundscape.

© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

In A Smile for You, Bonniers Konsthall takes a larger grip on Jeppe Hein’s oeuvre. Hundreds of watercolors hang in the exhibition center, painted by Jeppe Hein at a time when he was burned out. They are a form of diary in which the viewer can follow the artist from a deep state of depression to the first signs of recovery. The vulnerability found in the paintings alters the reading of the exhibition as a whole, and also presents a decisive shift in Jeppe Hein’s practice.

© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

 “Some works will appeal to the visitor’s senses; others will demand their active involvement. Some will create a funny situation engaging people to start a dialogue with each other; others will face the viewer with essential questions that they can only answer on their own. All of them will offer people a moment of being “right here right now“ and a smile on the face.”
© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

The exhibition A Smile for You is part of a larger collaboration between the artist Jeppe Hein, Bonniers Konsthall and Wanås Art. In a poster campaign, Jeppe Hein asks the public questions such as ‘what is happiness to you?’ and ‘how does it smell, taste, and feel?’. A selection of answers will be presented in the exhibitions at Bonniers Konsthall and Wanås Art. The collaboration also includes a joint publication, published by Walther König Verlag.
© Per Kristiansen

© Per Kristiansen

Focus on: Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

Paulo Nimer PJota started making street art when he was twelve years old. Later on, he started using painting to record his impressions of the world, of cities, and of art history. His works comprise superimposed layers of different materials. Graphisms and stains share the canvas with detailed figurative elements, which seek to represent realities of the visual arts and society. Among his influences, the artist cites Renaissance anatomy, the work of the German feminist Kiki Smith (1954–), the large-format paintings of the American Cy Twombly (1928–2011), and the works of Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960–1988), who gained fame as a graffiti artist before becoming a key artist of the 1980s.

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

 

Through drawing, painting, and installation, PJ creates images that superimpose the graphic and pictorial production of major urban centers to his own personal and artistic references. His lengthy production process is an integral part of his work. The artist is interested in accumulating layers of materials and references—which may not bear any apparent formal or thematic relation to each other. Using paint, pencil, pen, spray, masking tape, and other materials, PJ creates works designed to challenge the viewer’s gaze and perception, be it through the accumulation of references or through traces of the production process that remain in the final work.

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

His work is also immediately reminiscent of street art; however, it also uses less-regarded forms of urban expression, such as drawings, scribbles, and sayings on public bathroom walls, elevators, and prison walls. To PJ, these are political expressions that affirm freedom of speech. Paulo Nimer Pjota  worked on the gigantic facade of La Sucrière, the main Biennial venue. At once metaphorical, atmospheric and evocative, his works offer a rich visual repertoire – plants, crystals, skulls, flowers, mechanical objects, words and phrases, all floating free in different scales and dimensions – most of which comes directly from the streets of São Paulo.

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

© Paulo Nimer Pjota

Paulo Nimer Pjota was born in Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil. He lives and works in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Recent group exhibitions include SESC_Videobrasil, SESC Belenzinho, Sao Paulo, Brazil (2011); Paperview, John Jones Limited_Project Space, London, UK (2009); Ilegitimo, Paço das artes, Sao Paulo, Brazil (2008). Solo exhibitions include Considerações sobre o branco, Galeria Choque Cultural, Sao Paulo, Brazil (2010); Walking in the White, Anno Domini Gallery, San José, USA (2009). His work is in the permanent collections of the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, Norway; Centro Cultural São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Lodoveans Collection, London, UK; Sesc_Videobrasil, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

 Paulo Nimer Pjota

Videobrazil

Ai Weiwei – Zodiac Heads

© Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei

Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads (2010) is a pivotal work by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei (b. 1957). The group of sculptures was deposited at ARKEN by the Frahm Collection in June 2013. The work represents the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. As calendar signs, these animals have wide-ranging influence on everyday life in China.

© Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei

The work is closely tied to Chinese history. In the 18th century, 12 animal heads were cast in bronze for Yuanming Yuan, an imperial palace in Beijing. The magnificent gardens also included pavilions and fountains in the European style designed by an Italian Jesuit monk serving the emperor. The heads were ornaments on a large fountain. When French and British troops ransacked the palace in 1860, the heads were scattered to the winds. The event became a part of what the Chinese call the “century of national humiliation.”

© Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei

In recent years, the Chinese government has invested great national symbolism in these heads, notably in connection with a number of scandal-ridden auction sales of seven of the heads. The whereabouts of the last five animal heads remain unknown.

© Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei

In 2010, Ai Weiwei recreated the circle of animals to trigger a discussion about national pride and self-image. Working from the seven existing heads, he added his own reinterpretations of the five missing heads. Ai Weiwei’s art revolves around human rights and criticism of Chinese society. His persistent online activism has caused him a great deal of trouble. In 2011, he was arrested and held without trial for 81 days. Today, he is still not free to leave his country.

© Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei

Arken Museum

Yoko Ono Retrospective – Half a wind show

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Often referred to as “the world’s most famous unknown artist”, this large-scale Yoko Ono retrospective is sure to surprise, challenge and expand our notion of a legendary and extremely vital artistic pioneer. For more than 50 years Yoko Ono has been a leading avantgarde artist and influential pioneer. To mark her 80th birthday earlier this year Louisiana Museum of Modern Art now shows a major retrospective of well over a hundred works. The exhibition offers a rare opportunity to orient ourselves broadly in Yoko Ono’s multifaceted artistic universe, pinpointing central themes of her career and demonstrating the diversity of media and disciplines with which she works.

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Yoko Ono expresses herself with equal simplicity and originality in visual art, poetry, music, installation, performance art, film and events. The main element in her works are not materials, but ideas. Many of these ideas are poetic, bizarre and utopian, whereas others can be easily realized. They reflect her subtle humour as well as her decidedly socially critical conscience. While some of Yoko Ono’s ideas are manifested in the form of objects, others remain non-material. Often taking their starting point from her Instructions, oral or written requests to the public, Yoko Ono not only challenges our conventional ways of thinking but gives us a chance to play an active role and partake in the process of creation. Listen to the sound of the earth turning she encourages us, or Watch the sun until it becomes square.

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

As an introduction to the exhibition, one of Yoko Ono’s major architectural installations, En Trance, will be shown for the first time in many years. This architectural wall with its ambiguous title offers six different entrance options, allowing for various experiences. The first section of the exhibition features important works from the early 1960s where Yoko Ono became known for her ground-breaking experimental and conceptual works, performed first in New York and later in Japan. From here the exhibition continues with large spatial installations and recent works, including the brand new installation, Moving Mountains, where we are invited, individually or together with others, to form mobile sculptures from cloth bags. One area is specifically devoted to Ono’s musical production, represented by music videos, concert recordings, covers, posters etc.

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Yoko Ono’s great political commitment and her enduring efforts to reach out and engage in dialogue with people all over the world – through the use of social media, billboards and Participation Pieces – can be experienced within and outside the museum walls. In the Louisiana Park you are invited to hang your personal wishes on a Wish Tree and on large billboards in Copenhagen you will find poetic messages from the artist throughout the exhibition period.

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Courtesy of Louisiana Museum

Louisiana Museum

Tara Donovan

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Renowned American artist Tara Donovan creates sculptural objects of enigmatic beauty by utilizing and experimenting with simple, everyday objects like foil, toothpicks, straws and buttons. “Beauty is inherent in the material itself, form follows” says Donovan.

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Tara Donovan’s works are built up in the exhibit venue or carefully adapted and matched to the spaces in which they take form. They challenge our conventional ideas of proportion and our experience and interpretation of the things we sense and navigate amongst. In an interview in the latest issue of Louisiana Magasin, no. 37, Tara Donovan says: “I am striving to be an alchemist and to transcend the material”. She experiments with materials and with the human sensory system.

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

This exhibition marks Donovan’s first showing in Europe and presents eight of her works from the years 2004-2012, installed in the Column Hall and the Large Hall on the bottom floor of the East Wing of the museum. Sculpturally, they range from small crystalline growths to large organic landscapes with natural forms as a central reference point. Although organic, often nature-like formal idiom seems to be present, the works are always open to interpretation. Donovan is keenly aware that she is not simulating nature. It is rather an imitation of nature’s growth principles that holds her interest.

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

Courtesy ACE Gallery

 

Tara Donovan (1969) lives in New York and has already made her mark on the art scene, most recently with a solo exhibition at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Centre Pompidou in Paris has a work by her in its collection which appeared in the exhibition “Elles” showing works by the museum’s female artists. The exhibition is part of the exhibition series LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY. The exhibition at Louisiana has been created in collaboration with the Arp Museum, Bahnhof Rolandseck.

Louisiana Museum