Tauba Auerbach – Tetrachroma

© Tauba Auerbach

© Tauba Auerbach

Tauba Auerbach is considered one of the most innovative painters of our time. Her work collapses traditional distinctions between image, dimensionality and content. Surface and the larger issues surrounding topology have been central concerns in her recent paintings, drawings, photographs and artist books.

© Tauba Auerbach

© Tauba Auerbach

The title of the exhibition refers to a theory that there may be a small percentage of people – for genetic reasons, only women – who have a fourth type of colour receptor on their retinas. Most humans are trichromats, with receptors sensitive to red, green and blue wavelengths of light which combine to create the spectrum of visible colours. The tetrachromat, supposedly equipped with an extra variable that modulates every one of these colors, would therefore see distinctions between colours that are invisible to the trichromat.

© Tauba Auerbach

© Tauba Auerbach

Although Auerbach draws much of her inspiration from mathematics and physics, her visual output intersects equally with the basic themes of art history. Her paintings raise fundamental issues in new ways, among them the depiction of three-dimensional reality on a two-dimensional surface, and the relationship between abstraction and representation. Auerbach interweaves disorder and order, readability and abstraction, permeability and solidity – phenomena that are usually viewed as incompatible – into unified surfaces and volumes.

© Tauba Auerbach

© Tauba Auerbach

Curator : Solveig Øvstebø. The exhibition has been initiated by Bergen Kunsthall, in collaboration with Malmö Kunsthall and WIELS

Wiels

Selected by Ingrid Melano

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Retweet if you want more followers

© Aram Bartholl

© Aram Bartholl

In his work, presented at Xpo Gallery in Paris, Aram Bartholl, creates interactions between the Internet, culture and reality. Around the question of how the media influence us, so versatile they can be seen and as evidence of our world. A new model for the study of media, Bartholl not only seeks to know what a man does with the media, but rather that the media are the man.

© Aram Bartholl

© Aram Bartholl

The heart of his work is primarily derived from the tension between public and private, offline and online craze for technology and everyday life. Whether interventions or public facilities, Bartholl seeks again to measure the share of the digital world in the present reality, and what device it is there.

© Aram Bartholl

© Aram Bartholl

For the exhibition Retweet if you want more followers Aram Bartholl has created a new series of works around the ubiquitous Internet has need of attention. The steady stream of codes, signs and change pushes the user to filter, decode and correct every day.

© Aram Bartholl

© Aram Bartholl

Our minds are constantly invaded by the hidden code, videos or three-dimensional spaces in screens that scroll without limit, while a significant portion is not accessible to us. The trouble remembering what link was opened last week is ignored by the calm and hypnotic our screen appearance. And it awakens in us a smile. Retweet this now!

Xpo Gallery

Annika Von Hausswolff

© Annika von Hausswolff

© Annika von Hausswolff

This spring, ARoS is staging the most extensive exhibition to date with works by the Swedish artist, Annika Von Hausswolff (b. 1967). The exhibition is entitled Annika Von Hausswolff – It all ends with a new beginning and is staged in close collaboration with the artist. In addition to works dating from the 1990s until today, the exhibition also includes a completely new and site-specific work which Hausswolff has created especially for ARoS. On seeing Annika von Hausswolff’s motifs of drawn blinds, empty living rooms with sinister objects, children with chain saws, and naked bodies in the forest, we encounter a world which, all at once, seems both familiar and strange. We enter a parallel world where objects exude presence while people appear absent.

© Annika von Hausswolff

© Annika von Hausswolff

Since the 1990s, Annika von Hausswolff has made her mark as one of Scandinavia’s major artists. Working in a conceptual, feminist, and analytical way with the photographic medium, she belongs to the circle of young fine-art photographers who view and utilise the photograph in a new and often filmic manner. Her photographs are charged with a great deal of mystery: often very surrealistic and filled with recurring motifs and personal references. Frequently, the numerous objects and materials which she reproduces in her pictures are reminiscences of her childhood such as the recollection of her mother’s beige-coloured nylons.

© Annika von Hausswolff

© Annika von Hausswolff

Annika von Hausswolff is preoccupied with the human psyche and the way we experience our surroundings. In the main, her pictures are about perception: our experience of what we see, and the idea of being looked at. She presents sight as one of man’s most irrational, coded, and selective senses. Especially scopophobia, the fear of being looked at, is at the centre of several of her pictures. By hiding behind an object, turning their backs on us, or covering their eyes, Hausswolff’s figures avoid direct contact with our gaze. The exhibition title, It all ends with a new beginning, is a cryptic statement. In one sense, it expresses causality, a logical connection. In another, however, it is ambiguous and open. It implies an element of absurd repetition while also indicating that something new is underway. This interaction between coherence and uncertainty, absurdity and optimism, ending and beginning reflects, all at once, both the logical and the illogical universe characterising Hausswolff’s fascinating imagery. Curator: Maria Kappel Blegvad, MA

ARoS 

Martine Aballéa

© Martine Aballéa

© Martine Aballéa

© Martine Aballéa

© Martine Aballéa

“My New Year’s Eve Toast : to all the devils, lusts, passions, greeds, envies, loves, hates, strange desires, enemies ghostly and real, the army of memories, with which I do battle – may they never give me peace.” (Patricia Highsmith, Nouvel An, 1947). For her third personal exhibition at Art: Concept, Martine Aballéa presents two new series of photographs mixing landscapes with texts, nature and ghostly worlds. They tell love and crime stories that stand out from luxuriant natural backgrounds or from negative prints of images. At first, nothing exceptional or irrational seems to be going on.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

A few almost banal places are depicted; forest clearings, undergrowths, the façade of a house… then a sentence, in its simplicity and uniqueness, comes to identify and stigmatize the location, transforming it into a place of transgression or of refuge. Quickly it all swings into action: One sentence has been enough to drag us into a fiction that encourages us to step through the looking glass and enter a place where real life never leads us, and somehow become someone else.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

Being someone else is Martine Aballéa’s secret pleasure, a weapon that allows her to reshuffle the cards of joy, loneliness or sorrow. Such is the ultimate purpose of her game: To play tricks on the disenchantment and on the depression of life before it annihilates her, cheating on reality before it betrays her. The idea of being someone else, to be able to break the rules of the game without consequences, is often found in Martine Aballéa’s work. During the 1980s she began working on fiction texts, such as the “Romans Partiels”* series in 1982, “Epave du désir”** in 1995 and the “Nouveaux amours / Nouveaux crimes”*** series in 1997.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

In all these works she carefully develops the narrative link and tells us her very mysterious stories. The latest one is the story of a woman, a woman who represents many other women. Aballéa’s fiction often shelters characters that want to break free from something or someone on a social or on an affective level. In this new photographic series, she represents women who, for a reason or another, have gone all the way, as if the solution to avoid really turning into a psychopath was to invent a malevolent doppelganger for oneself and thus incarnate a woman- killer who represents the universality of relationship-breakdown and what it can entail. The causes are multiple, and Martine Aballéa draws up a non-exhaustive list, to which you can add your own causes. The exhibition almost becomes a sort of illustrated dictionary of love, representing all the comforting and dangerous facets inspired by the feeling.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

These images remind us of the plots of certain crime novels, such as the ones written by Raymond Chandler or Patricia Highsmith, where bucolic and nature-saturated universes are interspersed with places bathed in cold light such as the settings of the “Ghost Lovers“ series. All these places have been the theatre of painful happenings. Like her series of photographs, Martine Aballéa is a dual person. She can be both luminous and dark. When asked questions that she finds too intimate she becomes a secretive, fragile, restless and suspicious person, curling up into a ball and withdrawing somewhere far from the conversation. But when she starts talking about literature, love or her work, she straightens up, her eyes brighten and her smile returns. She can turn the Museum of Modern Art into an ephemeral hotel, and invent an endless house as homage to Sarah Winchester, peopling it with some of her own ghosts. In her photographs she stage-manages notions of ambivalence, doubt, violence or protectiveness just by subtly playing with light and shadows.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

Martine Aballéa is a primeval forest that is about to be completely drowned by vegetation. She is the white of negative prints or an invading colour; a mixture of cats, humans, books and sentences, something at once romantic and mystical. Even though her subject is tragedy its treatment remains poetic, offering the sharp sensations of an emotional hypersensitivity coupled with merciless irony and controlled cynicism in a very subtle fictional blend. In the images that are presented at the gallery, a murder has already occurred. The event is a symbol rather than something that has really happened. A man and a woman have played the main roles, the man isn’t there anymore, and the vegetation has quietly reclaimed its rights, erasing all traces of dread and leaving a ghost. As for the woman, she seems to have gone away, elsewhere.

Courtesy of art:concept

Courtesy of art:concept

Born in 1950 in New york, Martine Aballéa lives and works in Paris. Her work has been shown, among others, by the following institutions: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY; Musée National d’Art Moderne de la ville de Paris; Centre Pompidou Beaubourg, Paris; FNAC, Paris; FRAC Basse Normandie; Bibliothèque National de Paris, Cabinet des Estampes. Expositions (sélection) : La Maison sans fin au CRAC Languedoc en 2012, Musée de l’Abbaye Ste Croix, Les Sables d’Olonne en 2010, Fun House at the Centre National de la Photographie à Paris in 2002, Hôtel Passager, ARC, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 1999.

Art: Concept

Selected by Ingrid Melano

Anne Hardy

© Anne Hardy

© Anne Hardy

Maureen Paley, London is pleased to announce a presentation of new work by Anne Hardy. This will be her third exhibition at the gallery. Following on from her recent solo show at the Secession in Vienna, Anne Hardy will present three photographs, Notations, Script and Shelf and two new sculptural installation works, Two Joined Fields – Field (/\) and Field (decagon) and Fieldwork (materials).

© Anne Hardy

© Anne Hardy

This sculptural continuation has grown out of her recent residency at the Camden Arts Centre. It is the first time she allows the viewer to enter an actual space of her making. In the past these were created solely to be photographed and were always destroyed afterwards. Breaking away from this former process allows her to expand her working methods and has given her a new dimension to explore within this exhibition. The structure was created in the space one month prior to the show opening and has slowly taken shape during that time period.

© Anne Hardy

© Anne Hardy

Anne Hardy received an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art, London in 2000. Selected solo exhibitions include: Wiener Secession, Association of Visual Artists, Vienna, Austria, 2012 (cat.); Artist in residence, Camden Arts Centre, London, UK, 2011; Longside Gallery, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, Yorkshire, 2010; Maureen Paley, London, UK, 2009; ArtSway, Sway, UK, 2005; Laing Solo, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle, UK, 2004 (cat.).

© Anne Hardy

© Anne Hardy

Selected group exhibitions include also: Signs of a Struggle: Photography in the Wake of Postmodernism, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK, 2011; Copenhagen Photo Festival, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2010; Newspeak: British Art Now, Saatchi Gallery, London, UK, 2010; New Photography in Britain, Galleria Civica di Modena, Italy, 2008; To be continued…/jaatku…, Kunsthalle Helsinki, Finland, 2005. In 2006 she was nominated for the MaxMara Art Prize for Women in association with the Whitechapel Gallery.

Maureen Paley 

 

Jorinde Voigt – 9 Times Philosophy

© T Magazine

© T Magazine

In 9 TIMES PHILOSOPHY, Jorinde Voigt’s second solo exhibit at Klosterfelde, Berlin, the artist presents a new group of drawings based on philosophical and literary texts, including Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s “Prologue in Heaven” from Faust I, Epicurus’s “Letter to Menoeceus,” Wassily Kandinsky’s exchange of letters with Arnold Schönberg, works from Peter Sloterdijk, Douglas R. Hofstadter, Platon, Elias Canetti, and Paul Celan, and various “Haiku” from the most eminent Japanese poets.  Jorinde Voigt (born 1977) has developed a coded form of writing in her drawings to transform material phenomena into visual compositions. No matter how complex these processes are, the artist’s systems lend them at least an outward appearance of order. Through networks of lines, mathematical grids, and musical patterns that are at once chaotic and poetic, Voigt examines the workings of human perception and the factors that shape it.

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

In 9 TIMES PHILOSOPHY, Voigt allows the viewer to participate in her own experience of appropriation and her attempt to understand the texts at hand. The artist renders what she reads into a dense network of notes and surfaces that serve as placeholders for the images evoked. Each surface in the drawing represents a quoted passage that produces visual associations for the reader. Voigt sketches these imaginary forms on paper, cuts them out, plates them in gold, white gold, silver, platinum, or palladium, and fastens them back to their original place. The artist then combines this inlay technique with handwritten notations. Parameters such as “Rotationsgeschwindigkeit” (speed of rotation), “Himmelsrichtung” (cardinal direction), “Ausrichtung neues und altes Zentrum” (alignment of new and old center), or “Egomotion” (egomotion) contextualize the surfaces, which reflect subjective readings, in an objective system of orientation—the so-called “matrix.”

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Within this ever-present grid, Voigt varies the procedure and mode of representation for each surface. Following Canetti’s lead in Crowds and Power (1960), the artist allows her body to become part of the drawing process: “Rhythm is originally the rhythm of the feet. Every human being walks, and, since he walks on two legs with which he strikes the ground in turn … whether intentionally or not, a rhythmic sound ensues,” Canetti writes. As she draws, Voigt walks on top of the paper, and the traces of her footprints determine the contours of the gold plating. “It was a kind of rhythmic notation imprinted on the soft ground and, as [the person] read it, he connected it with the sound of its formation.”

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

“The sea’s vast floods surge up and break / in foam against the rocks’ deep base, / and rock and sea are hurled along / in the eternal motion of the spheres,” trumpets Gabriel in the “Prologue in Heaven” from Goethe’s Faust. Voigt employs verses like these to translate Faust (1808) into monumental wave formations in shades of gold and silver. In the tableau of four drawings, on view in the first room of the exhibit, a rouge-colored area also emerges. This takes its inspiration from Mephistopheles, who tells the Lord: “Full healthy cheeks are what I best prefer.” The image and passage appear next to each other in Voigt’s drawings so that the viewer can better understand their relation. Different from figurative work such as Leonardo da Vinci’s famous “Water Studies” from 1517–18, Jorinde Voigt’s drawings are not meant as minutely accurate visual representations but rather as embodiments of the thought process itself, which is always influenced by personal experience, emotion, and memory…”

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Courtesy of Klosterfelde Gallery

Voigt’s use of the non-colors gold and silver reflects the immateriality of her intellectual-philosophical pursuits. At the same time, the vibrancy of the shimmering, reflective precious metals contrasts with the starkness of Voigt’s systematic procedure. Jorinde Voigt lives in Berlin and was a winner of the 5th Drawing Prize from the Guerlain Foundation of Contemporary Art in 2012. Her work can be found in the collections of the Centre Pompidou Paris, the Museum of Modern Art New York, the Federal Collection of Contemporary Art (Bundeskunstsammlung) in Bonn, the Kupferstichkabinett Berlin, the Kunsthaus Zürich, and the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung in Munich. Voigt’s notations, musical scores, objects, and installations have been shown at the Nevada Museum of Art, the Royal Ontario Museum Toronto, the Museum van Bommel van Dam in Venlo, the Von der Heydt-Museum in Wuppertal, the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, and the Heidelberger Kunstverein.

Klosterfelde Gallery 

Selected by Ingrid Melano

The Cookie House

Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, in collaboration with ENSBA – Lyon – École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux Arts, presents the first Italian solo show dedicated to Riikka Kuoppala. The artist and filmmaker was born in Finland in 1980, studied in Tampere, Helsinki and Pittsburgh (USA), and today lives and works in Lyon and Helsinki.

© Riikka Kuoppala

© Riikka Kuoppala

The cookie house is the title of this exhibition, which combines two video installations by the young Finnish artist, in an attempt at conveying the suggestions that have emerged from her practice in the past few years. Under a Burning City (2010) is about the memory of war, and the way in which it is passed on to the younger generations. The protagonists, a grandmother and her granddaughter, are looking at the traces that the war left on their city. They evoke memories and try to find a common language to share and recollect past experiences. The film is set in Helsinki, a city that was repeatedly targeted with bombings 70 years ago. Living with traumatic memories is one of the key themes of this film, along with the difficulty of passing these memories on to someone who has not lived them. The film’s protagonists experience their memories as stories that help them survive an identity crisis. The gingerbread house which they build together represents individual experience in relation to the official truth, a silent truth that clashes against the reality of the new generations.

© Riikka Kuoppala

© Riikka Kuoppala

Just like Hansel and Gretel’s gingerbread house, the cookie house Riikka Kuoppala invites us to explore is both fascinating and unsettling; sweet and irresistible on the one side, dark and frightening on the other – the two souls of memory, the two faces of emotion in connection with memory. We have all experienced first-hand the moment in which memory is passed on and re-lived – the power of these emotions, as sweet as they are insane, like a gingerbread cookie house, both sweet and spicy. Riikka Kuoppala manages to do away with the forced interpretation dictated by the emotional mechanism. She lets the oneiric, estranging, grotesque subtexts of the Brothers Grimm tale emerge, using them as the red thread that connects her works – the parent-children relationship, or better the absence of it, and the resulting, multiple metaphorical variations that can arise from these conflicts.

© Riikka Kuoppala

© Riikka Kuoppala

The video Couch, TV and VCR (2012) describes the identity crisis of an fictional adolescent, the questioning of her whole system of values, and her reaction to this. The installation connects different layers of her memory; it is a tale of how the family can sometimes be felt as a stressful, hostile, unfamiliar environment.

Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo

Selected by Ingrid Melano