MATRIX A trip in Generative art with crystals, flakes and galaxies

© Donatien Aubert

© Donatien Aubert

Donatien Aubert is the prodigious talent of ENSAPC, the National HigherSchool of Arts of Paris-Cergy. His practice is developed from digital tools: CAD Computer Aided Design, animation, rendered three-dimensional models, computer programs at large. From this, he creates new works: interactive installations, sculptures, videos, photos.

Avid reader of contemporary authors about converging technologies (nanotechnology, genetic engineering, information technology and cognitive technologies), such asJeremy Rifkin and Francis Fukuyama, he structures his original researches in epistemology, logic, art of memory, science fiction, speculative philosophy, ethics and ecology.

The thesis offered by various futurists, like the transhumanist Raymond Kurzweil, that humanity, through the above-mentioned technologies, could decide about its evolutionseems more and more plausible. Changing our empathetic nature, our need for recognitionwould change our ethics and could therefore destabilize the political systems in which we live.

Let’s start from the general rendering of the research you did last year, what was it about?

I focused on fractal structures, auto generative systems and, more generally, on matrices. Fractals were studied because they are effective mathematical tools to describe a large amount of natural phenomena: in meteorology, to explain the formation of clouds; in molecular biology, to explain how the translation of DNA allows the formation of complex iterative structures inside the body such as the pulmonary alveoli, or the formation of synapses in the brain; in astrophysics to describe the formation of spiral galaxies. The study of the emergent properties of these systems needed the production of matrices to classify their features and simulate their interactions, to understand how simple elements, taken separately, can produce complex systems by associations…

Check the full interview I did in Paris for Horst&Edeltraut

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Interview – PopSchau

We met PopSchau creators, here interviewed by Gabrielle Berlin. PopSchau – the contemporary video magazine is a new platform that allows you to stay on top of contemporary culture providing an overview of what video content the leading magazines and blogs are publishing about each week. #Horst und Edeltraut managed to get hold of the three men behind it.

© PopSchau

© PopSchau

What exactly is PopSchau?

The Contemporary Video Magazine PopSchau provides you with an overview of what video content, the leading blogs and magazines are posting each week. You can watch the best contemporary videos in our weekly 3-minute news shows or customize your own TV channel from genres such as Film, Fashion, Art, Tech and Architecture.

Who, what, where are you? 


We are Ferdinand Prinz, Vito Leccese and Vincent O.

Ferdi is a recent University of Arts London graduate who is striving for the next digital revolution. Inspired from previous experiences at various creative ventures and companies, he is responsible for PopSchau’s innovational approach and look.

50%. 50% German-Italian Vito spent the last years in Los Angeles, where he studied Communication at Loyola Marymount University. So, he is in charge of PopSchau’s media coverage. Born and raised in Cologne he obviously got a big passion for soccer and art.

Vincent studied Internation Business and is the Marketing Pro behind PopSchau. He always had a great interest in film and thus lives out his passion with this new platform.

How did it all start?

(Ferdi) While trying out different tools for my previous blog “Kleine Wundertüte” (BlogWatch: Issue 3), I perceived an ever-increasing availability of high quality video content online. The idea of creating monthly visual summaries around arts & culture came up. After further researching the expansion of digital video in my graduate thesis, Vincent and Vito joined me for the development and we finally found PopSchau.

Your Style in 3 Words

Snoopy, Colorful & Dynamic

Who is your main target group?

(Vito) Well, it is for everyone who doesn’t want to waste any more time browsing endlessly through websites and videos trying to find something worth watching.

How do you think about colors and its combinations?

(Vito) Sometimes I have the impression that colors are underestimated even though their harmony unconsciously influences in our lives.

How did you come up with the name of PopSchau?

The expression was coined by the famous German daily news show “tagesschau”.

It is the German translation for Pop show.

What makes you different?

A good sense for aesthetics and zeitgeist.

Who or what inspires you the most and why?

(Ferdi) Maultaschen

(Vito) The mix of California and South Cologne

(Vincent) A coffee in the morning

If you could collaborate with anyone, who would it be?

(Ferdi) Spike Jonze – because he has a wonderfully unique mind

(Vito) Uli Hoeneß and Alighiero Boetti.

Which artist(s) or creative(s) do you tip for big things in the near future?

(Ferdi) 0broadway.com to my mind the first and only blog with real good films.


(Vito) Analia Saban an LA based artist and a friend of mine.

What keeps you up at night?

(Ferdi) Videos and Movies

(Vito) Electronic Music

(Vincent) A good idea

…And where can we find you at the weekends?

While Vito is scouting young soccer players, you can find Ferdi and Vincent out to have a few drinks, for sure.

…Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

(Vincent) There are a lot of possibilities. Online Video is growing to an enormous extent, especially due to higher internet rates and the emphasis on mobile. Hence we would like to be part of that development, engage in video productions ourselves and allow the user to watch PopSchau anywhere.

Anything coming up soon?

We are starting an interview series soon. But our current focus is to optimize our customization options.

PopSchau Online, on Facebook & Tumblr

Horst&Edeltraut

Trailer

Nostalgia – Photographs for the Tsar

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky traveled the land of the Czars, from Siberia to the Urals, from Tajikistan to Don to make what felt like his life’s mission: to document for the benefit of any future Empire, customs, faces, traditions, innovations, work, landscapes and architecture of a vast civilization called Russian Empire. Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky added a personal contribution of no less importance: the extraordinary color of his photographs, obtained by a technique based on the realization of three shots in rapid succession (take a whole lasted 2-3 seconds at most) of three filters of different colors blue, red and green.

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky was able to achieve this miracle technology due to his vast knowledge of the chemical processes involved in photography. Not only years before he had even studied under Dmitri Mendeleev Institute of Technology St. Petersburg, but to perfect his techniques in 1902 had gone to Berlin for six weeks, move on to learn the most advanced techniques for synthesizing color at the study of the photo-chemical Adolf Miethe, the pioneer flash and other innovations in the field of photography.

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

During his trip around the Russian Empire, Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky visited the most remote corners. He photographed the shepherds of Dagestan and the Emirs Uzbeks in vestments, the Armenian peasants in traditional costume and workers to work in the factories of the Urals, the Jewish teachers of Samarkand and the Kyrgyz nomads of Golodnaia, the soldiers of Belarus Minsk and Mandarins on the border with China, modern dams in Ukraine and views of Stone Town in Kazakhstan, Catholic churches and Orthodox monasteries in ruins, the steppes of Siberia and the roofs of St. Petersburg. Between rural and industrialization, just as Gorsky continued in its ten-year project, put the first World War and then the Revolution of October 1917, two events in quick succession that led to the slow and brutal liquidation of those contradictory images of many different big Russia.

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

When the wing of the Bolshevik Party took definitive control of the revolutionary masses, although he was offered an academic work, Gorsky decided to leave the country to emigrate to France, to Paris where he died in 1944 while another war was raging. Of the 10,000 negatives he had taken was able to take it with him that only 3,500 survived the Nazi occupation sheltered in a cellar until, after the Second World War, in 1948 the Library of Congress of the United States there purchase from the heirs of Prokudin for $ 5000 with the intent to restore and return the photo to its original color. In 1980 the publishing house Sidgwick & Jackson London picked up some in a volume entitled Photographs for the Tsar: The Pioneering Color Photography of Prokudin-Gorskii Commissioned by Tsar Nicholas II. Last fall, the publishing house Gestalten Berlin has collected some other in another volume. It’s called Nostalgia and it’s beautiful.

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

© Sergeii Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorsky

Studio

Selected by Ingrid Melano

Pola Void

© Jochen Mühlenbrink

© Jochen Mühlenbrink

Gerhard Hofland is presenting the second solo exhibition of Jochen Mühlenbrink (1980 Freiburg). The exhibition includes new paintings, installations and sculpturesPola Void presents a body of work that employs the trompe-l’oeil effect, a technique Mühlenbrink uses to emphasise the relationships between abstraction and figuration. By harnessing this effect, he can zoom in on the material itself and inhabit the boundary between representation and illusion, his area of exploration. As in all his work, these images investigate the tension between absence and presence, fiction and non-fiction. Where does reality end and artifice begin?

© Jochen Muhlenbrink

© Jochen Muhlenbrink

One painting depicts a series of Polaroids of landscapes and abstract compositions. The Polaroids are taped onto a grey background. In the hands of the artists, the landscapes and compositions featured in the Polaroids become of secondary importance to the photos based upon them. Herein lies the concentration. The lacquered instant photos against the matt, dry background and precisely replicated painted tape that secured the Polaroid.

© Jochen Muhlenbrink

© Jochen Muhlenbrink

Jochen Mühlenbrink graduated from the art academy in Dusseldorf in 2007; his tutor was Professor Markus Lűpertz. In 2010 he won the Főrderpreis fűr Malerei of the OEVO and in 2009 an overview of his work was presented in Kunstverein Heppenhein. In 2012 he won the Internationalen Bergischen Kunstpreis. In the spring of 2013 a selection of his work will be presented at the Morat-Institut für Kunst und Kunstwissenschaft in Freiburg and, in the summer of 2013 a large-scale exhibition of his work will be mounted at the Kunsthal in Wilhelmshaven.

Gerhard Hofland 

Réka Lőrincz rules Munich

© Réka Lőrincz

© Réka Lőrincz

Talking about contemporary jewelry, this spring the place to be is Munich: from 6 to 12 March 2013, jewelry lovers, museum curators and collectors from all around the globe will be converging on Schmuck 2013 at the International Trade Fair.

l rinczreka6

If you are in Munich don’t miss the works of Réka Lőrincz one of the leading figures in the young Budapest jewelry scene. Creating her works from recycled material, Réka Lőrincz deals critically with the new consumption habits. We particularly like her series from 2004, when she applied body jewelry to a real stage performance.

l rinczreka1-1

This special exhibition is the eldest European exhibition of contemporary jewelry. It takes place since 1959 every year during the International Trade Fair in March. Three contributions of Schmuck 2013 will be awarded with the Herbert Hofmann Prize. Moreover the jury of the Bavarian States will award a price of 5.000. €

Réka Lőrincz

Jesper Just’s solo exhibition

© Jesper Just

© Jesper Just

HEART was the first art museum to feature the Jesper Just in a solo show in 2005 and has since made acquisitions of his work a priority in its collection. Because of its long involvement and continued fascination with the artist, HEART is now organising a second solo show of the artist as a survey, highlighting the most significant pieces from the past 10 years of Just’s career. A career, which has enjoyed such international success and prominence that Jesper Just has been chosen to represent Denmark at the Venice Biennial in 2013.

The exhibition will also be the inauguration of a new and unique piece by Just, specially commissioned by HEART and generously funded by The New Carlsberg Foundation. The piece, entitled This is a Landscape of Desire, will form the core of the exhibition, which also features eight other works realised by the artist in the past 10 years.

Three of them (This Nameless Spectacle, 2011; Sirens of Chrome, 2010 and A Voyage in Dwelling, the eponymous episode of the 2008 trilogy) will be presented as monumental video installations in the main exhibition space of the museum, together with This is a Landscape of Desire. This will enable “a spatial experience”, where a powerful correlation between the emotional movement of Jesper Just’s characters and that of the viewers is established.

© Jesper Just

© Jesper Just

A psychogeography is traced by the artist’s imagination via the languages of visual arts, cinema and architecture. Over the years, Just’s work has scaled up: today his video installations have a sculptural presence that not only engages the viewers on a visual, but also on a psychological level, while it also tends to incorporate them physically, as will be evident in the exhibition.

Earlier single-channel works like It Will All End in Tears, 2006; Something to Love, 2005, Bliss and Heaven, 2004, The Lonely Villa, 2004, No Man is an Island II will be continuously screened in HEART concert hall, so that the audience can get a full perspective on Just’s body of work.

Jesper Just’s films started out more or less as recorded happenings, seemingly far from the carefully choreographed cinematic events that his work has developed into over the past decade. The artist himself, however, prefers to view them all as an integral part of his artistic oeuvre.

The question of representation, understood as the manner in which we create images -and how those images, in turn, conjure ideas, expectations and conventions, is central to Jesper’s work. One could say that to Just, what’s interesting about representation is that it never merely represents. Rather, it actively performs.

Of course, the question of representation and performance doesn’t merely apply to people or characters. Location too can perform. As can language. Music. Sex. Gender. Perhaps this is why the mainstream film is one consistent source of inspiration in his work. By digging into the representations of cinema and beyond, he attempts to elucidate the very limits of our imagination. The exhibition is curated by Caroline Corbetta.

© Jesper Just

© Jesper Just

HEART

Masked praising Uncertainty

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

Venice Carnival is one of the most fascinating traditions of my country. When ancient costumes, meet contemporary art, it becomes simply spectacular. With its perfect triangular shape, Punta della Dogana split the Grand Canal from the Giudecca Canal. The former monumental port is the permanent seat of the works from the collection of François Pinault after a major refurbishment project commissioned by François Pinault Foundation. The building is so unique and distinctive, feature changes so for the first time in its history, leaving the trades and becoming the harbor mouth to the peaks representative of contemporary artistic production and the place of choice to share with the wider public .

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

The exhibition Elogio del Dubbio, is curated by Caroline Bourgeois. It gathers historical works and new productions, some of them specially designed for Punta della Dogana. Exploring the idea of Uncertainty, as in Horst&Edeltraut new issue, the exhibition is questioning certainties in terms of identity and relationships. Twenty artists are presented and almost half of them have never been shown in previous exhibitions of the François Pinault Collection.

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

© Punta della Dogana

Punta della Dogana

Horst&Edeltraut

Selected by Ingrid Melano