Anicroches, one of the best exhibitions of the year

Anichroches, Variations, choral and fugue is a musical voyage, into Espace culturel Louis Vuitton, Paris, at the heart of which are sight and sound, and it is probably one of the best exhibitions of the year.

© Mustikka

We had access to the space through a elevator created by Olafur Eliasson, that lock the visitors into a soft darkness, no lights, no sounds. Then, moving through the exhibition, we discovered works that tackle the domains of sculpture or installation, and at the same time open them to the realm of music. Questioning the close ties between the body of the musician and his instrument, the creations presented there almost all have the ability to be played.

© Mustikka

Laurent Saksik, for instance, takes inspiration from the theremin (one of the earliest electronic musical instruments) to create a structure from which everyone is invited to generate a sound without actually making contact with it. Anri Sala’s offering, meanwhile, requires the presence of a saxophonist who, at appointed times, will initiate a duet with the work on display.

© Mustikka

We really had fun in there and i was impressed about how the visitor discovers through this exhibition –an itinerary that alternates music and silence, action and contemplation. For the duration of the exhibition, in the rotunda, the Espace culturel Louis Vuitton will invite visitors to take part in an unprecedented digital experience on the borders of artistic creation and musical composition.

© Mustikka

Well curated, perfectly organized, in a charming space and with great artists such as Rémy Jacquier, Christina Kubisch, Charlotte Moorman, Thierry Mouillé, Laurent Saksik, Anri Sala, Su-Mei Tse, Stéphane Vigny, this is an exhibition to enjoy in a group, exploring together all the soundscapes suggested by this great curatiorial project.

Espace culturel Louis Vuitton 

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Exclusive reporting: 24 h Museum

Today i finally visited the 24 h Museum, set for two days in Paris, in the beautiful setting of the Palais d’Iéna, where Vezzoli created a non-existent exhibition.

© Mustikka

The main room was a great design installation: made by gridwall, and full of fuxia neon lights, it was the perfect location for Francesco Vezzoli to show his personal tribute to the allure of feminility through interpretation of classical sculptures, featuring of course the image of his mother, and some of the icons he collaborated with during his career.

The event was very exlusive, with also a pink-carpet entrance. The first thing i noticed was the stairway, where mama was celebrated with a classical angle statue and some “like” in the hot parts of the sculpture.

© Mustikka

There was finally a third room, where some night visions were set, mixing strobo lights and classical images, location of the glam event that was visible yesterday on the website.

© Mustikka

Prada presented, in collaboration with AMO, a Baroque festival, an exclusive fashion meeting, and a celebration of italian stereotypes, on fetish pink, red and polka dots backgrounds.

24h Museum

We have been framed by Francesco Vezzoli!

Prada presented the 24 h Museum, designed by Francesco Vezzoli with AMO, Rem Koolhaas‘ think tank. The 24h Museum opened in Paris on Tuesday 24 January for 24 hours only, till Wednesday 25 January, in the historic Palais d’Iéna, the building designed by Auguste Perret between 1936 and 1946, today home of CESE (Conseil Economique, Social et Environnemental), the French ‘third Chamber’.

© Francesco Vezzoli

Me and my boyfriend went there hoping to get in, and we did it! AMO’s installation for the 24 h Museum is divided in three sections, each inspired by a particular type of museum space: historic, contemporary and forgotten. The three sections are instrument to the sequence of events that take place during 24 hours in different areas of the ground floor of the Palais d’Iéna. The central space is a large metal cage made from grills and neon lights that encloses the work by Francesco Vezzoli.

© Francesco Vezzoli

In the three sections – historic, contemporary and forgotten – Vezzoli is creating a “non-existent museum” where he shows his personal tribute to the eternal allure of femininity through interpretations of classical sculptures that make reference to contemporary divas. “They are my icons turned into sculptures and placed on marble pedestals”.* At the top of the stairway, epicentre of the building, Vezzoli is placing a majestic sculpture of a female, reinterpreted with the features of a mysterious goddess. Vezzoli’s vision is of a museum that exists for just 24 hours and which is also a celebration of a collective rite that mixes visitors, red-carpet, Oedipus’ complex and night visions.

© Francesco Vezzoli

The 24 h Museum opened on Tuesday 24 January with an invitation-only dinner. At 11.00 pm  turned into a disco-club featuring Kate Moss and many other guests.

Anthony James’ vitrines in Milan

Don’t miss tonight the opening at Brand New Gallery of the exhibition Consciousness and Portraits of Sacrifice, the first Italian one man show by Anglo-American artist Anthony James. The Milanese space hosts two installations by the artist of the series Birch Cube, from which are configured as two transparent light boxes, luminous cubes that contain intricate virgin forests of birch wood, multiplies infinitely thanks to mirrors .

© Anthony James

On the path of Damien Hirst, in the past the artist has also interred the charred remains of his Ferrari 355 Spider, now for his future projects he turns to objects of fetishism from war, such as the AK-47 assault rifle or the Russian MIG-15 warplane. Born in 1974 in England James gained his diploma at the Central St. Martins College of Art and Design in London in 1998. He currently lives and works  in Los Angeles.

© Anthony James

 Brand New gallery

Let’s sit down before we go

The Yancey Richardson Gallery is showing Let’s sit down before we go, the exhibition of the last series of works by Dutch photographer Bertien van Manen. Van Manen’s work is a meditation on human existence, revealing the truth of particular lives. Selected from her travels through Uzbekistan, Siberia, Ukraine, Georgia, Moldova, Moscow and Tartarstan since 1990, van Manen’s photographs are characterized by the intimacy she achieves with her subjects, with whom she spent countless hours sitting at their tables, lodging in their homes, immersed in their reality.

© Bertien van Manen

Van Manen provides a window into Russian lives following years of struggle under the Communist regime in order to show us how millions of Russians live and sleep, what they eat, what they look like in their everyday life, in their flats, at their tables, in their beds.

© Bertien van Manen

Born in 1942 in The Hague, The Netherlands, van Manen lives and works in Amsterdam. Her work has been exhibited internationally at museums such as the Fotomuseum Winterthur, the Reina Sofia, and the Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Tokyo. The series Let’s sit down before we go will be presented in its entirety at FOAM Photography Museum, Amsterdam in March 2012.

Bertien van Manen

Selected by Ingrid Melano