Courtesy of Planthouse

Courtesy of Planthouse

Planthouse is presenting an exhibition featuring Glen Baldridge, Ian Cooper, and David Kennedy Cutler. While the mood of show could be labeled “abject”, these artists evince great care and craftsmanship in working in progressive and hybrid forms of printmaking, soft sculpture, paper-making, digital printing, and sheet-metal sculpture. Baldridge, Cooper, and Cutler are represented by individual styles, but they consider this exhibition a collaborative exercise they have dubbed Thousand Year Old Child.

Courtesy of Planthouse

Courtesy of Planthouse

Accumulated wisdom is the pride of adulthood. In contrast, artists are expected to perform the role of the radiant child, the youthful renegade. C.S. Lewis said, “when I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” To be young forever is to be enlightened. Today, everyone thinks they are C.S. Lewis. Society as we know it has formed around this notion: eternal youth, fast cures, and gratification of the self at all costs. Someone else will clean up the mess. The adults have gone on permanent vacation, and no one remembered to take the trash out of the house.

Courtesy of Planthouse

Courtesy of Planthouse

But allow us to switch tenses, subjects, and sense. Allow us to leave our mess in your house. We’d like you to know something is wrong, that something happened here, but we’ve forgotten what it was. Asuggestion? A statement? No, no, no… a secret: tidal waves of regret and shame, an archaeology of self-loathing, under pried up floorboards, bad bodies, shed limbs, impotent dollars, preserved food- stuffs, electric violent eye-hole peak through hole cut-offs. Cannibal culture teething for muscle milk, mother’s milk, and Prevacid. Looking worse and worse in your underwear. Is this what aging feels like? Is this what being alive is like?

Courtesy of Planthouse

Courtesy of Planthouse

We’d say this is theatre for the absurd, but you’d say it’s just a series of vignettes. Step through the gates. You’re just a tourist here (in your house) and we’ve decorated so nicely. We’d tell you to suspend your disbelief, hold it to-fucking-gether, and don’t get sick. Be cool. Definitely don’t feel compelled to enjoy yourself. If you look at it you’ve broken it, and we spent so long breaking it so bad. So come over, it’s our house now. But we’ll give you one pointer for the trip: make it like you care, and beware the tantrum of the thousand year old child.

Planthouse 

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

One year ago I had a terrific conversation with French artist Donatien Aubert entitled :“MATRIX – A trip in Generative art with crystals, flakes and galaxies”Donatien Aubert is the prodigious talent of ENSAPC, the National HigherSchool of Arts of Paris-Cergy. His practice is developed from digital tools: CAD Computer Aided Design, animation, rendered three-dimensional models, computer programs at large. From this, he creates new works: interactive installations, sculptures, videos, photos.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Avid reader of contemporary authors about converging technologies (nanotechnology, genetic engineering, information technology and cognitive technologies), such asJeremy Rifkin and Francis Fukuyama, he structures his original researches in epistemology, logic, art of memory, science fiction, speculative philosophy, ethics and ecology.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

The thesis offered by various futurists, like the transhumanist Raymond Kurzweil, that humanity, through the above-mentioned technologies, could decide about its evolution seems more and more plausible. Changing our empathetic nature, our need for recognition would change our ethics and could therefore destabilize the political systems in which we live.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

After one year, my critical text of his work: “The Infinite Possibilities of Modularity”, 2013, AV, Université Cergy-Pontoise, Paris, has been published. Donatien Aubert deploys a proteiform work which discovery can be accomplished by exploring a field of knowledge that engages in crystallography, molecular structures, and cosmology.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

In this critique I focused my remarks inspired by Aranda/Lasch’s modular designs, particularly by examining the modular aspect of the structures that have interested Donatien Aubert, and unlimited capacity configurations that are likely to occupy these crystalline formations.

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Courtesy of Donatien Aubert

Donatien Aubert’s work takes the form of experimental research, bringing together contemporary scientific, epistemological and artistic issues. He develops projects from complex IT processes to articulate his ontological questions problematizing his demonstrations areas.  Each project includes material that qualify space singularly, searching for new possibilities of modularity.

Donatien Aubert

Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Paris

 

 Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli


Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

The text written by curator Jason Hwang, in occasion of the exhibition “Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” is a good starting point for our talk. Here is an excerpt: Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” is an exhibition that looks like a field. An agricultural field that can best be described if included in a production system, embedded in the cycle of nature. A field that extends to the point of including every obvious point of view on reality, and in so doing, bring new light to a story that began when humans started to cultivate directly what supports it, making it part of the same potential of agriculture through the ability to use every phase of their cycle”. What is your relation with nature? 

For me the Nature is a metaphor. Actually I think my field of investigation remains the man’s relationship with reality, understood as the subject more “real” as possible. The material entities at the beginning of the world.

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

You have always been attentive to popular art, in which the materials, simple tools of rural culture, are assuming a metaphysical value and are loaded with meanings in a anthropological reading of reality. The materials like iron, wood, glass, ceramic, plastic, clay are holders of meanings, to create parallel semantic fields in the process of creating the meaning of the works. Have you done any research on the properties of materials? And where do you find them? 

Every element has physical properties: I find this interesting, and still part of the human mind. Part of my research is to do some anthropological research. And in recent years I have documented them in three books that I have been able to publish. I think metaphysics is the right margin to understand what is not seen, but it is understood. In this sense I would suggest to read John of the Cross. 

Normally, I work with some excellent craftsmen, I think that the concept of authorship should be redefined. Sometimes, as in the case Obsidian, this mean to look it where is present. In this sense, is someone else to share with me the experience of “doing” the work. And in that case it is Alessandro Biggio and his project “Arms / Braccia”.

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Almost like a narrative, the artificial element follows the natural processes, in which the passage of time acquires a fundamental role, there is a certain materiality in your work, a certain tactility. If we could state that the natural world stands for something real and tangible, is this aspect of your work a kind of romantic-existential reaction to the new digital world? 

I have worked with “true” materials, because I care to emphasize Nature as metaphor and the Human being as an element. Well, first we should ask “What is the new digital world?”. If you mean “Post-Internet”, I am very interested. But I find there is a generalization. I do not think anyone is interest in doing the works “with technological things”, this is not the goal. This, at least, may be the surface of the problem. 

I recently saw three incredible works, one is “Energy Pangea” by Iain Ball, the other is “non-human expressivity” written (but that explains very well his attitude in the works) by Katja Novitskova on Performance as Publishing (an in print format by Rowing space in London). And last one,  I saw again, after a few years, “Closed Biosphere ” by Tue Greenfort. There are three examples, in my opinion, very good about how you can use in art  “also” some technological or “synthetic” aspects for to talk about anthropological practice  or, at least, what concerns the man  in general. 

So no, I often use “real things”. In my latter show “Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo” I’ve also used some real fishes with a mass in the stomach!

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Could we say that in your work there is something similar to what Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev wrote in her essay: Wordly Worlding: The imaginal fields of science/art and making patterns together? (Mousse Magazine 43, page 76) “I argue instead new materialisms, and scientific studies, so that form of art and forms of life can be combined, sharing architectural and creative knowledge with bees and butterflies and beavers, with bacteria and microbes, with eukaryotic cells as well as with software… This neocybernetic, ecological perspective is committed to pleasure, imagination. This is not a “naturistic” backclash against the urban or the artificial, a turn which would be simply neo-Romantic, even detrimental to the scope of becoming-with, and of doing so outside the frames of current production systems”. 

I do not know if my work is “existentialist” or romantic (… maybe because I’m Italian … I joke …!). However, I think,  the dividing line relates to that is true in material reality, which as I have already said, does not corresponds with the tangible and empirical world. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

“The animals they rest – quietly like sculptures. – I am hungry so I eat them like words. – “We are two farmers on a field – We arrange and we order – Farm & Form, – waiting patiently for feedback. – This is our campania felix. – Over there is a sea, and it is filled with fish it is filled with fish. – There is one for you and one for me and.. – tomorrow there will be another for you and another for me. – We are hunters and we see everything eye to eye. – The sun makes a brief appearance and the room is filled with color. – But afterwards, it is still there, beyond my perspective, – beyond my proximity.” is the poem written by Jason Hwang in occasion of”Pane pane pane vino canale di scolo”. How was the collaboration with him?

Our collaboration came about in a very natural way, while some conversation for the preparation of the exhibition “Eux” at Shanaynay (the project space that he co-directs in Paris). I think he has deciphered very well the spirit of the show, and, moreover, that poem is definitely perfect. During our stay in Naples, we also presented “Pangasius” at Madre Museum: a conference – or better yet, a video playlist – about the issues of biophilia and biomorphism so as genetics applied to agriculture. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

You are represented by several galleries like Fluxia in Milan, Valentin in Paris, but your collaboration with Umberto di Marino, Naples, is an historic one. It looks like the gallery has been sustaining your work from the beginning. Do you want to tell us something about your relation with them?

Is exactly as you say: I work with Maria and Umberto Di Marino by long time, and I think this continuity is a value. Naples is a city with a tradition of excellence about contemporary art, although, of course, is not a the production center like London or New York. However, I find that working with them, as well as with institutional spaces in Naples, has many positive aspects and  a sincere cooperation. I can say I have a very good relationship with all  people that I work with. With regard to Di Marino, in the past we have obtained some very good results as the Illy Prize – “Present / Future”, in 2009. And they were among the producers of “Europe 3000″, the work that I presented for “Illuminations”, the 54th Venice Biennale, curated by Bice Curiger in 2011. 

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Courtesy of the artist, © Danilo Donizelli

Umberto di Marino Gallery 

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Meditallucination is 13 new significant paintings on canvas by Geoff McFetridge, presented at V1 Gallery, Copenhagen. McFetridge has developed a distinct visual alphabet and vocabulary, his paintings are minimal, but convey overwhelming possibilities. He puts a lot of faith in the viewer’s ability to finish what he started.  The lack of charged or abundant information enables the viewer’s mind to compensate and stimulates a personal narrative.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

A silhouette of a girl in a bathing suit, barely suggested by the juxtaposition of colors, caught on a cyan pane dissecting the canvas, is at once poetic, humorous, heartbreaking, mundane and magic. The work is titled “The Trap” and is a precise example of McFetridge’s visual language, a tightrope between figuration and abstraction. Remove one color or line, and the composition collapses.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

”I have always been interested in creating work that lies between image and language. Imagery that your mind “reads” as language rather than seeing them as spatial or physical things. These graphic images are for me a way to induce a misfiring of our mind to create a connection, and resonance for the viewer. I want them to feel something, not happy, or sad, but to feel like the letter T”.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

“The images are meditations, in that they come from inside but they are also listening to the world around me. The paintings attempt to deeply engage with reality to try to attain transcendence. Hallucinations in that they are a made of the raw material of our brain, beyond experience, they are found images that are nearly hard wired into our minds.” – Geoff McFetridge, LA, 2014.

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Courtesy of V1 Gallery and Geoff McFetridge

Geoff McFetridge, born 1971 USA, is a Los Angeles based artist and multidisciplinary auteur. Instinctively ignoring creative boundaries, McFetridge has created everything from poetry to animation, from graphics to ceramics, from movies to wallpaper. He has created title sequences for the movies Virgin Suicides, Adaptation and Where The Wild Things Are. He recently created artwork and interface design for the Oscar winning movie HER, directed and written by his long time friend and collaborator Spike Jonze. He has exhibited widely throughout Europe, America and Japan.

V1 Gallery

SQUASH CLUB: Florence 2003 (installation view). Foto: David Stjernholm.

SQUASH CLUB: Florence 2003 (installation view). Foto: David Stjernholm.

In a Squash Club in Østerbro, one of the richest areas of Copenhagen, artists Louis Scherfig, Frederik Worm, Morten Knudsen and Hubert Franz,  put up an exhibition and made documentation. The use of colors was definitely exalted by the Squash Club’ light,  but no one saw it, it was never visible. It is only visible online. Squash is a racquet sport played by two (single) or four (double) players on a rectangular field bounded by four walls. Squash is recognized by the Olympic Committee and is played using a particular racket total length equal to that of a tennis racket, but with a smaller dish of the strings. 

Hubert Franz: Untitled. Foto: David Stjernholm.

Hubert Franz: Untitled. Foto: David Stjernholm.

Interesting considerations can be written about the ball’s tiny colored dots that provide informations about the game.

Color: Blue ~~ Game Speed: High ~~ Bounce: Speed ~~ ​​Players’s Level: Advanced

Color: Red ~~ Game Speed: Medium ~~ Bounce: Medium ~~ Players’s Level: Normal

Color: Green ~~ Game Speed: Slow ~~ Bounce: Low ~~ Players’s Level: Intermediate

Hubert Franz: Untitled. Foto: David Stjernholm.

Hubert Franz: Untitled. Foto: David Stjernholm.

The ball is a hollow sphere made ​​of rubber, weighing about 23 grams. During the game, with the increase of the temperature also increases the elasticity and speed of the ball.

Color: White ~~ Game Speed: Slow ~~ Bounce: Low ~~ Players’s Level: Intermediate

Color: Yellow ~~ Game Speed: Very Slow ~~ Bounce: Low ~~ Players’s Level: Beginners

Color: Yellow (x 2) ~~ Game Speed: ​​Very Slow ~~ Bounce: Very Low ~~ Players’s Level: Competition

Frederik Worm: Untitled, Koenji Café Cats. Foto: David Stjernholm.

Frederik Worm: Untitled, Koenji Café Cats. Foto: David Stjernholm.

The Squash Club is also the center of the élites’ meeting and in the text “The Hyper Horrors of Lee Meo” presented in the exhibition, the viewer assist to a classical club conversation: 

“Okay, this might sound senseless, but I think we are both in pain

間抜け…. 私を殺す、私はカント場合はフェリーニを持って、私を殺す

I had an operation done yesterday and I am heavily sedated and unreliable. That’s why you shouldn’t receive help from me since I am more or less helpless myself. You see I am in the middle of a perfect dehydration – one thing the doctors told me to be careful about.

Louis Scherfig: Sporting Pistachio. Foto: David Stjernholm.

Louis Scherfig: Sporting Pistachio. Foto: David Stjernholm.

I am a mess as you can see. This shirt isn’t even mine, really.

私に私の肌をお返し、お願い (pointing to the skin hanging from the iron rack)

Yeah I see it, you ‘ve been hurt. We’ve both been hurt, the two of us. I had an operation and you’ve hit a dvd display and now some of the skin from your elbow is stuck there.

黙って私の肌を与え、私はそれを戻って欲しい! (Still pointing)

Yes. You’ve been hurt. We both have.”

 

If you happen to find yourself in Paris, I strongly recommend Neïl Beloufa’s exhibition En torrent et second jour at Fondation d’entreprise Ricard. This exposition provides a perplexing entity, with a combination of sculpture, video, installations and photography. These elements end up being a linear exposure, a real indulgence for the spectator, while displaying a puzzling series of work completed by the final touch of Mihnea Mircan, the invited curator.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

The exhibition space consists of several rooms: in the first one, the artist’s video Brune Renault from 2010 is on view. The settings are quite simplistic: four teenagers finding themselves in a red Renault in a parking garage. It seems like a typical Friday evening, with fleeting moments of disagreements, flirting and jealousy, characters being like classic movie figures. However, a rupture appears once realizing that they only pretend to drive in circles in the parking lot, everything around is moving except them: the passing landscapes flashing through the windows are finally, only a moving stage. The whole video seems like an eternal repetition, with Johnny Hallyday’s song Le penitentier coming from the stereos over and over again: “Haven’t we already been here?” asks one of the girls repeatedly.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

The first room with its projection serves as a starting point and as a conclusion for the rest of the exhibition: when entering the other rooms, we can always discover traces from the first one. Exploring the second room, with its installations and videos, is like witnessing a crime scene: everything seems to be in a chaotic order. There is a disturbing feeling, something is definitely wrong. Still hearing the traces from Hallyday’s song, seeing a video with the very same characters as in the first one: it seems like a reproduction of the first scene, this time with real life settings. We’re part of an experimentation, with video cameras, microphones and surveying eyes: as if we were kept under surveillance, but at the same time, having the power to survey others. This surrealistic experience between different worlds is emphasized with the objects: high tech combined with clumsy, childish like sculptures.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

In the third room, the characters that we’ve already met reappear in different forms, with a monitor presenting a live edit: surveillance camera footage synchronized with Brune Renault. This is where the exhibition reaches its final closure: there are so many necessary, yet unnecessary elements, which held the entity together. The final parts of the exhibition are recurrent with the thematic while questioning several dichotomies: where are the borders between reality and fiction, presence and absence? What does the cause and effect stand for? When merging these components, the artist deconstructs our beliefs and prevailing ideas, while proposing that the fiction can be real, and vice versa.

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d'entreprise Ricard

Courtesy of the artist and Fondation d’entreprise Ricard

Neïl Beloufa at Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, until May 24 2014.

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

One of the best titles I have read this year is “Stone Age” ( Miguel Figueroa, Pin Up 15). PIN–UP is an architecture and design magazine, the latest editors’ obsession has possibly been Italian marble, and in the article mentioned above, there are several references to concepts that have been developed with marble, such as architectures, sculptures, prints. I started researching about granite, glass, marble, and quartz one year ago. In february 2013 I introduced the a granite-framed pencil drawings on paper by Andrea Romano. And this edition of MiArt fair just confirmed this trend if we consider the quantity of marble works presented at the fair.

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

We are facing a Stone Age, Minimalism died, and we are inspired by the richness of marbles from Renaissance palazzi to contemporary temples of retail or travel. But Carrara marble has been used since the time of Ancient Rome. The city of Massa, in particular, saw much of its plan redesigned for new roads, piazze, intersections, pavés. Following the extinction of the Malaspina family, the state was ruled by the House of Austria and management of the mines rested with them and today there is the Marble Museum, taking care of the estate. According to a New York Times article of 1894, workers in the marble quarries were among the most neglected labourers in Italy. The debate about stopping the marble extraction for human rights reasons in that area is still going on.

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Now the new obsession of Pin Up’s creative director Felix Burrichter, seems to be for Seminato. And I follow him on this new wave. Seminato has been too often ignored or disregarded. In Italy, floors are generally made of marble or the so-called Seminato, or “sown floor”. The inspiration comes from Venetian floors were the original decorations were created by using the variety of colors of marble. Even the masters of this ancient craft could not imagine the vast echo this idea would have in later centuries, embellishing the most elegant palaces and most magnificent residences with poor materials. The Venetian flooring is present almost everywhere; in Genoa, in particular, acquires its own characteristics in the style of the decorations in marble mosaic hence, the name “Genoese Floor.”

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Courtesy of Pomo Galerie

Pomo Galerie is taking in serious consideration this new Stone Age. Opened few months ago in Milan as a space for dialogue about aesthetics, it is also the public expression of Pomo Studio, innovative research design and communication consultancy for cultural and commercial clients. In occasion of the opening tomorrow, they are presenting the work by Delfino Sisto Legnani, photographer, graduated in architecture. Delfino collaborates with important international and Italian magazines, artists, museums, and architecture and design teams. He develops photographic research projects focused on the changes in society in relation to the territory and this time he will present his reflections about Seminato.

PIN–UP

 Pomo Galerie

Delfino Sisto Legnani

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