Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: Dear Patrick, you were born in 1974, you live and work in Berlin. Your works have been exhibited in museum contexts and in public spaces in Italy (Venice Biennale, Gallery of Modern Art in Milan, Piazza del Popolo in Rome, MART) and abroad (Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, de Appel, Amsterdam, Shanghai Biennial, Biennial of Havana, Folkstone Triennial). Could you confirm the correctness of this information?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: Everything is correct!

Ingrid Melano: Great :) When I think of your work, I have in my mind reflective surfaces, lasers and colored neon lights, are there other components that I forget?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: I would say the man and its possible representations, his figure recently.

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: Yes, actually there is a very nice dimension in your past works, of dialogue with the public, but lately it has been replaced by the item “mask”, could we talk a bit about it?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: More than the mask I think to the face, the place of the human body that perhaps better than others can tell certain emotions.

Ingrid Melano: Our editor Martina Alemani came to see the making off of the exhibition for Studio Guenzani in Berlin this spring, together with the artist Andrea Romano, they told me wonders..

Patrick Tuttofuoco: They have seen a lot of the creative process, it is always nice to see everything that goes on before the show!

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: Yes, I would like to know more about your family, and your life in Berlin in general, how does it work? Do you follow a routine in the creative process?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: More than routine I would say that I try to maintain a certain constancy of studio work, the reality of the studio is one thing that I started to love here in Berlin, before it wasn’t really my dimension. If I think about my situation here in Berlin I think of a strange mix of the children (with all that they represent, full of joy and responsibility) and art that also gives you beautiful emotions and bitter-sweet situations.

Ingrid Melano: How were the faces presented in Ambaradan, your last show in Milan, technically created?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: It is a few years now that I’m working on hardening of tissues, in this case I wet the flat matter of the fabric in a mixture of resins and before the curing process began, I gave it a form that is close to a human face.

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: What was it like to work with the curator Nicola Ricciardi in the exhibition ?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: Funny and inspiring, and it was an exchange of contents which only after that took shape and in my and in his head, from there we began to develop the idea of the exhibition.

Ingrid Melano: It may sound like a rhetorical question but, having traveled around the world for Revolving Landscape, and after the Berlin experience, do you plan to stay there?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: It is always very difficult to think of ourselves in one place, my curiosity for sure did not stop, but Berlin could become a good base for constant movements.

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: I understand, but it seems to me that the city of Milan always welcomes you with great enthusiasm.

Patrick Tuttofuoco: Milan is my home and it always will be, there are some people to whom I am deeply connected and gave me a lot, I will never leave for good from Milan!

Ingrid Melano: My favorite work among yours is certainly Luna Park (2005), could you tell me something about the installation?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: It was the original sign of the amusement park “Varesine”, an important place for the city, for my generation and those before, unlike other similar places in the city center it occupied the area as a species of geographical anomaly. Then issues related to speculation have led to the closure and before that they dismantle it all, a friend told me that the signage was still there, so I decided to retrieve it and bring it back to light.

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Ingrid Melano: Yes and it is a great idea, every time I walk by Lambrate, the signage makes me think of Marcovaldo (1963, Italo Calvino), and stories of ghost towns. Which is the feeling you have, revisiting the place after many years?

Patrick Tuttofuoco: It is my most nostalgic work, perhaps even too much, what I think is that I was very lucky to manage that project!

Ingrid Melano: It is true! Nostalgic is an interesting definition! Thank you Patrick!

Patrick Tuttofuoco: Thank you, it was fun and I hope to meet you soon in real life!

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Courtesy of Patrick Tuttofuoco

Studio Guenzani

 

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

A Moveable Feast – Part XI is the second collaborative exhibition of Eileen Quinlan and Cheyney Thompson at Campoli Presti, Paris, on view until 26th July. In Quinlan’s new black and white gelatin silver prints (2014), photography is used as a space for performance. The female body, reshaped by the glass it’s pressed against and veiled by the effect of vapor and water, is first documented extensively with a regular digital camera. Selected images are later rephotographed with a 4 x 5 large format camera, allowing Quinlan to work serially and to explore further the relationship between the limits of analog photography and the virtually infinite possibilities of the digital. The final prints are the result of a wide array of physical interventions that degrade the surface of the negatives, such as scratching the film with tacks, steel wool, and ballpoint pens and leaving the film in a bath saturated with chemicals that accelerate or alter the developing process. Here, the sheets of film are processed by hand. Quinlan uses her fingers to push the emulsion across the surface of the negative rather than using the rollers of the Polaroid back.

The prints are all equally sized and pinned directly onto the wall, emphasizing their status as images rather than formatted objects. The lack of a frame, a distancing mechanism, makes these works fully available to the eyes of the viewer. The color Polaroid photograph Fine Motor Skills (2014), is the first in a new series. Quinlan is using the tiles the artists’ children play with to create a sculptural form reminiscent of a fairy-tale castle or the Cologne Cathedral.

Courtesy of the artists and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artists and Campoli Presti

 

Courtesy of the artists and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artists and Campoli Presti

Thompson’s latest series of works continue his investigation on the technology, production and distribution of painting within the context of current abstract economy. The works on view are based on the “Drunken Walk” algorithm, an aleatory path that is used in financial theory to predict stock prices. In his “Stochastic Process Paintings”, Thompson executes the algorithm inside the three-dimensional color-system created by Albert Munsell. The diverse positions the line draws within the solid of the color model can be translated into amounts of different hues, saturations and values that Thompson finally applies on canvas in squares of one centimeter. All of the works in the series share the same quantities of color information, 8034 square centimeters, thus determining the format of the paintings.

A homologous procedure is followed in his Broken Volume sculptures through the multiplication of a one inch concrete cube along a path prescribed by the Drunken Walk algorithm. In these works, the constraint placed on the sculptural form consists only in the quantitative. All the works produced in this series share the same volume of concrete, 10 liters. With no regard for their own structural limits, they are left to break under their own weight. Outside of the smoothed numeric space of their conception, they continually orient themselves to the material forces embedded in the temporal conditions of exposure and circulation. The works are developed in dialogue with recent critical approaches towards parametric architecture, used for modeling, monitoring and prediction purposes in a context of increasingly mobile political decisions.

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

 

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Eileen Quinlan lives and works in New York. Her work forms part of the permanent collections of MoMA, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the FRAC (Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain), France. Her work formed part of the exhibition New Photography 2013, curated by Roxana Marcoci at MoMA, New York. She has recently participated in the exhibitions Rites of Spring at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas (2014), in What is a photograph at the International Center of Photography, New York (2014), «Y? O! G… A.», with Matt Keegan at The Kitchen, New York and All of this and nothing at the Hammer Museum (2010). Quinlan has had a solo exhibition at the ICA in Boston (2009).

Cheyney Thompson’s work is part of the permanent collections of MoMA, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Centre Pompidou, Paris. His work is currently included in the exhibition Une Histoire. Art, architecture et design, des années 80 à aujourd’hui at Centre Pompidou, Paris. He recently had a solo survey exhibition at the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Massachusetts (2012) with an accompanying monograph and was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. Past exhibitions include Chat Jet – Painting ‘Beyond’ The Medium at Kunstlerhaus Graz (2013), The Complete Reference: Pedestals and Drunken Walks (solo) at Kunstverein Braunschweig (2012); The Indiscipline of Painting at Tate St Ives (2011); Systems Analysis at West London Projects and Langen Foundation, Germany (2010); Greater New York at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center (2005) and Clandestine at The Venice Biennial 2003.

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Courtesy of the artist and Campoli Presti

Campoli Presti

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

My disbelief to see, in I‘m still here, the unlucky Joaquin Phoenix falling into a grotesque and swirling professional and personal failure, catch me and stimulates me as a viewer, in a subtle game in which any information that is passed, falls into the hypothetical midpoint existing between reality and fiction.In the contemporary paradox of a Phoenix that, in 2010 Casey Affleck’s mokumentary, says goodbye to his acting career and to the stage, in order to pursue an unlikely career as Mc, the highest level of knowledge and awareness of truth, is accompanied by an ease of modification, similar to pre-writing oral narratives.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

In a violent switch, this knowledge, together with the recent vision of the exhibition of Neil Beloufa(1985), Superlatives and Resolutions, at Mendes Wood gallery, Sao Paulo, makes me think that, perhaps, I’m still here and his works are not so different. Beloufa’s work is a balanced and reasoned combination of fiction and reality, aimed to creating complex, credible and real narratives, even if completely built and fictitious.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Through its structures, the objects, and his videos, the artist analyzes and draws attention exactly on language dynamics and on its more subtle facets. Above all its infinite possibilities of production and stimulation of visions that arise from general knowledge and preconceived ideas that each viewer brings with himself. With a strong sense of irony, Beloufa, create displays that manipulate and mix the narrative, surfing the reality and the fiction, producing a kind of new oral transmission approachable language.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

In this mood, the Franco-Algerian artist, has opened its first solo show in Brazil, on display until July 26. In the branch spaces of gallery Mendes Wood -Vila Romana- Beloufa exposes a series of installations, video works, thought in relation to the exhibition space. Several modular pieces, which consist of several common objects, create a multidimensional landscape in which to move, jumping from one suggestion to another. The objects become focal points of the space and the viewer is suddenly immersed in a strangely plausible and recognizable landscape, though made ​​up of uncertain and lame images.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

As in the work Maya SP, the effect; the causes and the fall (2014), in which, from the title, we are led to the perception of something deeply wrong, anachronistic and far from our understanding. At the same time, we read in it a sort of hidden and encrypted truth, that we think to be able to understand, convincing ourselves that through the use of a fan and a domestic plant, the artist, is suggesting us a cross-section view of a – more or less – old historic event.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

A powerful and seductive exhibition that presents in the best way the work of a complex and dynamic artist, able to play with that fine line between the possible and the impossible, that captures and entertains the viewer. How would it be possible to think that Joaquin Phoenix really did himself a disservice.

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

Courtesy of Mendes Wood

 

Mendes Wood

 

 

 

 

 

Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

“The installation at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion is the seventh and last exhibition of the series Architectones. The pavilion is questioning the idea of template, the pattern of the open plan, the idea of decor and function within a representation of a nation. My project brings the possibility to discover a new point of view on the pavilion from the decks built over the pools. The perspective of the deck’s line is the only pre-existing diagonal in this rigorously right-angled architecture. I put an emphasis on this perceptible perspective by adding materiality to it.

Photo Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Photo Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

“Dawn” by Kolbe is the only figurative presence in the pavilion: I chose to focus on it by making different contemporary versions of the sculpture, in various sizes and materials. The shape evolution of the human nude is significant: its representation is constantly changing even though it should be permanent. The line of growing sculptures also appears as a metaphor of the journey of the architecture in time: the pavilion is an ultimate milestone of modernity and my contribution, this show, introduces as well the idea of ‘seriality’.”

Xavier Veilhan, 2014.

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Xavier Veilhan (1963) is an internationally acclaimed artist based in Paris, France. Since the end of the eighties Veilhan has developed his work in various formats including sculpture, painting, performance, video or photography. His work is inspired by the vocabulary of classical art and is marked by a modernist legacy, besides having in mind the contemporary use of high technology. Xavier Veilhan defines art as “a tool for the vision to be examined through the understanding of our past, present and future.”

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

His exhibitions and in situ installations for public spaces, gardens or houses question our perception, creating a traveling space where the audience interacts, evolves and becomes an active player (Veilhan at Hatfield: Promenade, 2012; Architectones series, 2012-2014). His recent work includes the sculpture Jean-Marc (2012) permanently installed in the center of New York and the performance Systema Occam (2013) in Paris, Marseille and New York. In 2014 he will open a number of solo exhibitions in Seoul, Moscow and Sao Paulo, and will make various interventions and projects in Sweden and South Korea.

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Courtesy Galerie Perrotin. Photo © Florian Kleinefenn ; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2014

Xavier Veilhan is represented by Galerie Perrotin (New York, Hong Kong and Paris), Andréhn-Schiptjenko (Stockholm) and 313 Art Project (Seoul).

Architectones MAMO

MiesBcn

SansSouci is pleased to announce the release of the first Issue: Bestiary. Several special guests participated to the opening cocktail party at the Italian Embassy in Paris, on October 25, such as the former Prime Minister Enrico Letta, Bernard Stirn president of Opera Paris, Max Moulin from Insitut Français, the ambassador Giandomenico Magliano and Giada Santasilia.

SansSouci Issue #1 Magazine Bestiary

SansSouci is a series of collectors’ objects that every year change format. Introduced to the public in exclusive numbered copies, only few people can own a SansSouci edition. Released once a year, SansSouci features different artists in each issue. Some of the names in Issue #1 are, among the others, Barnaba Fornasetti, Philippe Parreno, Martin Parr, Pierpaolo Ferrari, Tala Madani, Stefano Giovannoni, Patrick Tuttofuoco and Rainer Ganahl.

SansSouci Issue #1 Magazine Bestiary

If the Issue #1 is a collection of pictures, SansSouci is a project with images in all their forms. Bestiary is large-format and visually-driven magazine, international in scope and based on a big collaborative spirit. The Issue #1 will be distributed to the most important museums and cultural institutions in the world. SansSouci is about contemporary art with a capital A, and all the themes that go with it: music, design, architecture.

01

Promoting the passion for artistic collaborations, creativity and innovation, SansSouci hopes to stimulate new dialogues. Moreover, healthy ecosystems and environments are necessary to the flourishing of humans. In this sense SansSouci is actively engaged and certified in Eco Sustainability, calculating the emissions of greenhouse gases, and offsetting the remaining emissions through actions of protection of Italian forests. Arty, ecological, chic…in a nutshell: SansSouci.

SansSouci Issue #1 Magazine Bestiary

Artists in the Issue #1: Martin Parr, Dario Guccio, Erik Sandberg, Patrick Tuttofuoco, Jacques Habbah, Alice Rosati, Barnaba Fornasetti & Valeria Manzi, Giovanni Gastel, Lisa Dalfino, Luis Fernando Benedit, Peter Buggenhout, Dan Hillier, Jason Roher, Luigi Presicce, Riccardo Beretta, Jacopo Foggini, Pierpaolo Ferrari, Peppe Tortora, Chie-Chi Chang, Harry Gruyaert, Richard Kalvar, Trent Parke, Alan Chies, Philippe Parreno, Iris Touliatou, Philippe Durand, Gérard Traquandi…

SansSouci Issue #1 Magazine Bestiary

…Gonzalo Lebrija, Bouke de Vries, Davide Stucchi, Beatrice Marchi, Nico Vascellari, John Isaacs, Francesco Joao Scavarda, Matteo Graziani, Julian Prebisch, Hidde Van Schie, Michele Gabriele, Tala Madani, Valerialaura Rapoport & Luis David Golberg, Ditroit, Jochen Schmith, Mark Van Yetter, Stefano Giovannoni, Azuma Makoto, Robert Müller, Matt Pyke, Rainer Ganahl, Thomas Julier, Daniele Milvio.

SansSouci

 

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Your latest show “My Heart’s With You” at 63rd-77th Steps – Art Project Staircase in Bari (Italy) was curated by Alex Ross who wrote a sensitive-funny conversation between “L & R” as the exhibition’s text. How did your collaboration started?

After some exchange of e-mails in order to focus the objectives of the exhibition, I sent some preparatory drawings of the work. Alex has created a fictional dialogue between “L & R”, the two female protagonists. The thing seemed so relevant that I decided to entitle the project in that way. Anyway, by those thoughts, the popular character of the local market and the humility of everyday life emerge very well.

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

What caught first my attention were the water transfer tattoos on cutlery trays, with their pink colors. Where do these inspirations come from?

I spend a lot of time in Chinese shops and megastores, searching for characterizing objects that could describe our current situation, simply by exposing them as a work of art. My interventions are slight, the conceptual difference is minimal as the sum of the same objects that are stratified. For example, removable tattoos on cutlery trays as well as the lock of synthetic hair and all elements that humanize my pieces. These tattoos, that I applied on the two trays forming the sculptures on the wall, do not evoke the concept of tattoo as it is usually intended. Mine is not a permanent sign, but an ephemeral characterization of everyday life.

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

How did your view and research change from the time you left your hometown? And how was relating to it for this exhibition?

Perhaps the city has changed, but the social context of Bari does not, it has never been easy. I wanted to focus on the daily life of “Libertà” area, one of the most popular and authentic expressions of this metropolis.
In big cities there are different social codes from the average. And this is even more true in the buildings of the popular side of Bari, which become small-scale social entities, with their own rhythms and rules: sometimes they differ from those with social codes, that we normally know about. This was my main purpose when I approached the capital of the region where I was born.

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

From June 27, 2014 to August 15, 2014 you will be part of “Speedboat” exhibition at Nicelle Beauchene in New York. How will you contribute to this group show?

In the exhibition “Speedboat” at Nicelle Beauchene in New York, I will expose some artworks that I titled “Portraits”. They are transparent resin plates with objects embedded, which become descriptive clues/attributes of a particular person, and a character. For this reason, I thought about a title so clear and simple. The significance, at least, is the “play of references” that these objects produce in the viewer.

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Courtesy of Lucia Leuci. Photo Rosa Ciano

Which direction are you giving to your works?

After these last projects, I will continue to analyze the life in the cities, especially that one of teen-agers. As they are the most receptive subjects of the society, in an aesthetic and anthropological sense, I will study their habits, their choices, the way they change and look, etc. In order to represent the main characteristics – such as precariousness and ephemerality, relating to the emotional status and also to the use of materials – of the society in which we live. Or – at least this is my intent.

63rd-77th Steps – Art Project Staircase 

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery

 

 

The current exhibition at Mon Chéri in Brussels, offers a fresh selection of young, upcoming artists. This group exhibition entitled BIEN OU BIEN?, which is organised in close collaboration with the Parisian galleries Valentin et Jeanroch Dard, features several young artists: Gabriele Beveridge, Aline Bouvy, Hamishi Farah, Mike Goldby, Manor Grunewald, Lucy Kim, Torben Ribe, Amanda Ross-Ho, Dominic Samsworth and Michael Staniak. Among these, I selected my personal favorites, on which you should keep a close eye in the future.

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

 

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Hamishi Farah, a 23-year old Melbourne-based artist, had her first major solo exhibition, Albeit Tho at Blackartprojects in Melbourne earlier this spring. Her acrylic paintings reveal a strong connection, almost an obsession-like relation with the online community. This digital era as a way of life is revealed through her cartoonish-like approach to painting, with image saturations and a strong inspiration coming from graphic art and contemporary pop culture. Her work examines the contemporary society as it is nowadays, but she does it almost with a naïve approach: and this is something that makes it really fresh, finally revealing to be more realistic than ever.

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

 

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

 

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

The same playful line is pursued in the work of Torben Ribe, with his collages and acrylic paintings. This Danish artist (born in 1978 in Hobro, Denmark, works in Copenhagen), has already made his big début in the Parisian art scene earlier in 2013, with his major solo exhibition entitled Landscapes and Fruit at Gallery Hussenot. As a starting point for his work, he creates a strong relation with the exhibition space and interior design more generally: creating thus “interior situations”, as Frieze magazine has described (Frieze 20th April 2010). Through these arrangements, the artist creates surprising encounters in the interior space, using ambiguous domestic pieces that caught our eye: these might seem banal at first sight, but there is always a disturbing element which is strongly present.

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

 

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

 

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artists and Mon Chéri, Brussels

The work of the third selected artist, Melbourne-based Michael Staniak (born in 1982), continues with the same themes as Farah and Ribe, although with a more methodological approach, studying the instant digital creations. The artist uses for example digital uv prints in his work, which create a strong visual layered effect: a good example of this is his recent series of paintings, Instapaint. Staniak studies digital strategies more within the framework of object making: even though he paints mostly by hand, by building texture with layers of plaster, his work end up resembling to digital prints, creating thus a modern trompe-l’oeil. This Australian artist had his major international breakthrough with his major solo exhibition earlier this year, Image DNA, at Steve Turner Contemporary in Los Angeles.

Hamishi Farah

Torben Ribe

Michael Staniak

Mon Chéri

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