Courtesy of Antenne Books

Courtesy of Antenne Books

The second issue of Baron is a photographic journey over a 12-month period, photographed by Tyrone Lebon and guest edited by Max Pearmain. Released in October 2013, it includes 36 pages in colour. Published in an edition of 1000 embossed hardcover (size 235 x 300mm) in pink silk and gold.

Courtesy of Antenne Books

Courtesy of Antenne Books

A central theme for this issue has been to question the evolvement of sexuality in today’s image sharing society. For example, the voyeur and exhibitionist were once used to describe those who spied or exhibited themselves to unsuspecting individuals, now it is increasingly used to define the audience and performers of reality projects. In our late post-modern age, sexual desires have been packaged, marketed, and are sold as adult entertainment.

Courtesy of Antenne Books

Courtesy of Antenne Books

Baron’s Second edition also includes a number of portraits of women who in one way or another have benefitted professionally from sexuality. From lingerie designer and erotic writer Britta Uschkamp, to musician and photographer Aza Shade and artist Daphne Greca, to erotic model Kit Hammonds, who wears a specially commissioned Baron motorcycle jacket by Lewis Leathers. 

Baron Magazine

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Jorinde Voigt’s first solo exhibition in Milan and her second with Lisson Gallery features medium- to large-scale drawings and a new collaboration with Mads Dinesen, an influential young fashion designer based in Berlin, on a series of hand-painted and embroidered Things to Wear. Voigt, who also lives and works in Berlin, creates significant and highly original drawn or painted abstract forms that are intricately interconnected by lines of text or movement. Her new series, carefully wrought in pastel, pencil and ink, is entitled Salt, Sugar, Sex and obliquely refers to the bodily functions that conspire to regulate our physiological production of these three important elements and hormones. As well as suggesting internal organs, Voigt’s drawings recall flower blooms or nerves connected by stems or branches, while plants themselves are similarly governed by biochemical reactions, involving the absorption of external stimulants and nutrients and the production of enzymes needed for cellular growth or change. 

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Not only do Voigt’s works seem to function at a metabolic, almost molecular level, they also suggest wider, symbolic associations – the reds and blush pinks standing in for heat and energy, as well as having emotional resonance with passion. Just as nature, science and culture collide in Voigt’s frequent use of literary or scientific quotation alongside her drawn schema, so too do the oft-separated activities of philosophy and art, or thinking and doing. Her interweaving of decisions and pathways is a result of conflicting factors, among them her own gestures or marks in time and space, as can be seen in another major work, Yes or No (Ja Oder Nein), in which the vein-like interconnecting red lines signify an experience or recording of the present moment – each is accordingly tagged with the word ‘Now’. 

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Voigt is also unveiling her first ever collaboration with a fashion designer, the Danish-born Mads Dinesen, who often imbues his innovative collections with artistic, spiritual and even political undertones. While Dinesen has designed the pieces and sourced fabrics onto which Voigt has applied splashes of paint, the resulting kimonos, entitled Things to Wear I-V (an almost literal translation of the Japanese word) are very much co-creations towards truly multifunctional, transformative, aesthetic objects or even as they see them, towards “wearable pictures”.

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Courtesy of Lisson Gallery

Voigt renders even the most unfathomable subjects – including, in this exhibition, the biological mechanics and spatial movements of the body, quantum physics and the passing of time – into elegant visual structures, albeit in the knowledge that each attempt is ultimately futile. “Futility is not a ‘weakness’ or an ‘absurdity’: it is a strong sign: the more futile, the more it signifies and the more it asserts itself as strength.” Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, 1977.

Lisson Gallery

GREAR PATTERSON  Forest TheaterForest Theater is the catalogue published in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name (8 October – 30 November 2014) by Grear Patterson at the American Academy in Rome, curated by Peter Benson Miller. The exhibition and the catalogue are a collaboration between Depart Foundation and the American Academy in Rome. Both the exhibition and the book summon formative moments in the artist’s life, a recollection of rites of passages, tapping into a collective, rather than simply a personal, consciousness.

GREAR PATTERSON  Forest Theater

The wide format book is a collection of snapshots from the exhibition, which have a melancholy aspect and invoke personal recollections of places and events. These photographs explore the sense of nostalgia and of lost innocence in the transition from childhood to adulthood.

GREAR PATTERSON  Forest Theater

The exhibition consists of various media – sculptures, videos, photographs, canvases and a collection of objects from the artist’s childhood – which acts as a sort of Proustian madeleines. While many works where conceived expressly for the exhibition and respond to specific spaces at the American Academy in Rome, they draw upon a piecemeal personal archive that spans many years and refers to disparate moments and events.

GREAR PATTERSON  Forest Theater

These moments might be constructed as typical of an American childhood and the turbulent passages of adolescence, in the context in which Proustian memory and nostalgia enjoy wide currency as a cultural aesthetic. Format: 34.7 x 24.5 cm.; Pages: 48; Language: English; Edition of 500 copies; Year: 2014. Text by: Peter Benson Miller; proof reading: Tijana Mamula; Editor: Lorenzo Micheli Gigotti; Art Director: Francesco De Figueiredo.

GREAR PATTERSON  Forest Theater

Edited, designed and published by NERO

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Matteo Pomati was sitting right next to me at the after-show dinner in occasion of Tufo at Gasconade’s non profit space in Milan. I immediately became even more curious about this figure, to my eyes he appeared just as his works: intangible, ethereal, someone to look longer at to get the essence.

With his atemporal work he anesthetizes the eye and makes the spectator wanting to see it again to bear it in mind. Painting is everything. Crushing into the new media in an exclusive post-academic way.

My imagination went on after he talked to me about his research and showed me two new works.

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Apathy-for-the-bon goût drama. The reflections are disturbing, making me feel the same as when I was reading an article about “pornographic” photos of objects with people’s naked reflections on the objects’ shiny surfaces.

Colors are blind. The gaze is fatigued, and it is like spending evenings’ hours on the sofa in front of a TV; brain death, scrolling down your Facebook pages with the visage enlighten by the screen. But there is so much beauty to explore.

Reality’s still life, wanting to stop it now and ever in a lust for image.

Photo: Roberto Apa

Photo: Roberto Apa

Photo: Roberto Apa

Photo: Roberto Apa

The result is noir, the 16:9 format brings back to movies’ vision, I thought about Jean Luc Godard’s Alphaville and some screenshot of moments coming from Natacha von Braun’s mind. And here you go back to reflections, not even having had the time to think that they are fake, like the ones in some Anime drawing.

While walking outside armada – the studio Matteo shares with some artists and curators of his generation – I could read “adagio” road sign in the courtyard, a perfect italian word used in music jargon, as he suggested to me; and the perfect conclusion for that dialog.

His works are “so evident, to disappear”.

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Courtesy of the Artist

Courtesy of the Artist

Matteo Pomati was born in Milan, 1989. Lives and works in Milan.

Gasconade

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

In 2012 Simon Starling presented Black Drop, a film about the transit of Venus observations and their relationship to early Cinema. Predicated on the idea that the 2012 transit may be the last to be recorded on celluloid (the next transit will occur in 2117), Black Droptracks the development of the French astronomer Jules César Janssen’s innovative “photographic revolver”, a device designed to counter human error in timing the crucial moments of Venus’ contact with the edge of the sun.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

The device was influential in the development of the Lumiére brothers’ cinematograph.Together with a small film crew, Starling travelled to Hawaii and Tahiti to observe and film the 2012 transit of Venus, and the sites of previous observations and photo-documentation (Point Venus, Tahiti and Honolulu). The recording of the event formed the basis for the production of a film about the relationship between the transit of Venus and the history of cinema, as framed by the parenthesis formed by the 1874 and 2012 transits.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

The book is a kind of ciné-roman on the film project. It will include a shot-by-shot account of the film with the voiceover as accompanying subtitles. It tells the story of the relationship between astronomy, photography and the beginnings of moving image technology, together with echoes about epic voyages and vast distances.

Simon Starling Black Drop Ciné-roman

Born in 1967 in Epsom, England, Simon Starling attended Nottingham Polytechnic and the Glasgow School of Art. His work is in the permanent collections of distinguished museums, such as the Tate Modern, London; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Starling has had solo exhibitions at numerous international venues including Tate Britain (2013); the Power Plant, Toronto (2008); Städtischen Kunstmuseum zum Museum Folkwang, Essen (2007); Portikus, Frankfurt (2002); UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002); Kunstverein Hamburg (2001). In 2003, the artist represented Scotland at the 50th Venice Biennial. In 2005 he won the Tate’s Turner Prize.

Humboldt 

Photo Lucia Leuci

Photo Lucia Leuci

We opened yesterday our physical space in via Panfilo Castaldi 4, in Milan. New editorial office of The Art Markets, the space will offer a cozy spot where to find the best of independent European press in town, with the support of various publishers and of all the artists that collaborated at The Art Markets since 2009, year of its foundation. Performances and dj sets will animate the Milanese foggy nights, and The Art Markets’ merchandising will be available for everyone. The Art Markets website offers art reviews totally advertisement free: proud of being totally independent in their editorial choices. The fundings obtained from the sales in the space will be re-invested in other editorial initiatives.

Photo Lucia Leuci

Photo Lucia Leuci

The Art Markets’ desire is to create a place of encounter for the younger generations, a cool spot where to get inspiration from, where to find new ideas from abroad, a living space where to party and have a good time. A cozy room where to find new friends. A posh isolation. Milan, which really lacks of cool bookshops, has to get international and burn, especially in concomitance with the Expo, and The Art Markets will be fuel for that. The bookshop will be focused on artist books, catalogues, design and illustration, Japanese photo books, magazines, theoretic books and zines, and we promise not to forget about fashion. Periodically publications will be presented at The Art Markets space with the artworks or artists featured at a time, including presentations and book launches.

Photo Lucia Leuci

Photo Lucia Leuci

All the visitors are welcome to interact in the new space, to talk about their new projects, which can eventually be presented on The Art Markets’ website. Books and magazines must be needed, touched, consumed and not just watched. To cite just a few of the publishers that will be available in the bookstore: Antenne Publishing, BUTT, Bergen Kunsthall, Bronze Age Editions, Bywater Bros, Cura, Conveyor Editions, Dashwood Books, Ditto Press, Dobedo, Confessions, Edition Patrick Frey, Editions Taube, Etudes Books, Fourteen Nineteen, Getsuyosha, Gottlund Verlag, Humboldt, Kaleidoscope Press, Kaugummi, Livraison, Mousse Publishing, Nieves, Oslo Editions, Printed Matter, Shelter Press, Taka Ishii, The Ice Plant, The Velvet Cell, Torpedo Press, the selection will change every month according to the patterns of demand.

Photo Lucia Leuci

Photo Lucia Leuci

The Art Markets was born in 2009 as the first European website of contemporary art in the warm and welcoming salons of Milan. The TAM guys are traveling, a lot. Interviews, reviews, press coverages, Skype sessions and studio visits are just some of the activities they enjoy doing together. And to this they associate a series of on paper editorial collaborations with various international magazines. The concept of market derives from the Greek Agorà, the main meeting point of the ancient Polis, the center of public life. That’s also where the logo comes from. And that’s why the guys chose the location of Repubblica, a urban square for exchange of ideas and arguments. The Art Markets is first and foremost a talent scout program for young artists, but also a European window for established artists.

 

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