Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

“The mirror is thoroughly egoless and mindless. If a flower comes it reflects a flower, if a bird comes it reflects a bird. It shows a beautiful object as beautiful, an ugly object as ugly. Everything is revealed as it is. There is no discriminating mind or self-consciousness on the part of the mirror. If something comes, the mirror reflects; if it disappears the mirror just lets it disappear . . . no traces of anything are left behind.” (Zenkei Shibayma, On Zazen Wasan, Kyoto, 1967)

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

The Premier Machinic Funerary Part II is the second installation in a series depicting a form of hyper-commercial ancestral worship. The installations present abstracted funerals for the 3D printed scan of ancient hominid fossils set in contemporary retail or commercial environments. Arising before art, and marking a transition in the emergence of humans, intentional burial is the oldest of all rituals, as well as evidence of a complex cognition capable of the abstraction required for thinking about the afterlife. Dating back 60,000 years it has also been observed among the closely related Neanderthals, who decorated their transitions into the afterlife with flowers and antlers.

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Perhaps more appropriately understood as anti-funerals, these installations mark the re-emergence of a lifeform as it transitions through various phases from organism to fossil, or from CT scan to 3D print. Phase transitions are said to occur at critical thresholds, switching a physical system from one state to another, like the critical points of temperature at which water changes from solid to liquid, or from liquid to gas. These critical thresholds structure the topological space of possibilities within any physical system and thereby define its expression into the physical world.

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

In this installation, the phase transitions undergone by this Homo Habilis (1.9 mya) and Paranthropus Aethiopicus (2.52 mya), which themselves originate at the threshold of humanness, provide an example of how being itself exists primarily in the topological realm of possibilities, and only in the secondary emerging into the physical through a given media. Timur Si-Qin

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Courtesy of Carl Kostyál

Timur Si-Qin (b.1984 Berlin) is an artist of German and Mongolian-Chinese descent who grew up in Berlin, Beijing and the American Southwest. Si-Qin has shown internationally at the Taipei Biennial, Bonner Kunstverein, CCS Bard New York, Museum Fridericianum Kassel, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art Beijing, Société Berlin, among others. Si-Qin lives and works in Berlin. The Premier Machinic Funerary: Part II at Carl Kostyal in London follows Part I presented as part of the Taipei Biennial 2014, and will be followed by Part III in New York with Eleanor Cayre in November.

Carl Kostyál

Timur Si-Qin

 

Preview in pictures of this edition of Fiac art fair. A selection of 2D works you may find in Paris.

Hans-Peter Feldmann

Hans-Peter Feldmann

Marieta Chirulescu

Marieta Chirulescu

Sebastian Black. Courtesy the artist & Balice Hertling

Sebastian Black. Courtesy the artist & Balice Hertling

Albert Oehlen. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris

Albert Oehlen. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris

Matt Sheridan Smith. Courtesy of the artist and  Kaufmann Repetto, Milan / New York

Matt Sheridan Smith. Courtesy of the artist and Kaufmann Repetto, Milan / New York

 

 

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Namsal Siedlecki

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Namsal Siedlecki

In september, the start of the new season was celebrated in the wide space of Ventura XV, Lambrate, Milan, with Keep It Real, a self-produced project, managed in every aspect by the artists: Alis/Filliol, Luca De Leva, Andrea De Stefani, Helena Hladilová, Invernomuto, Diego Marcon, Giovanni Oberti, Gianandrea Poletta, Namsal Siedlecki, along with Vittorio Rappa (fundraising and logistics) and Daniel Sansavini (graph). The idea for the exhibition was born a couple of months ago, without long premeditation: Andrea De Stefani and Namsal Siedleck both had the desire to deal in a practical manner and on a common space with other artists, so they moved their ass to realize this intention. They spread the proposal to their peers and what had started as a private chat, turned into a chorus of nine artists. Keep it Real is a slogan born in the suburbs of American cities and spread since the 80s through the voices of oldschool mc’s and rappers. It is a reminder that, in an hyperbolic mood, invites to authenticity, to keep our feet on the ground, and to live in a pragmatic way.

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Diego Marcon

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Diego Marcon

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Diego Marcon

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Diego Marcon

Now that the exhibition’s doors are closed, it’s time for reviews, and Keep it Real seems to be like a message read and understood by all the artists involved in this collective project, even in the most ironic nuances. Each of them dealt with the experience of everyday life in a similar way, as active interpreter and keen observer of sensible reality. Each artist was constantly immersed in facts, landscapes, circumstances, forms, specific behaviors of the everyday, without filter: for instance, people who prefer to dive belly and then resurface the head. As a result, the works in the exhibition were multiform projections of an analysis which took place on a common ground. The aggregation of personality preceded the choice of the works: there wasn’t any previously established critical path through specific productions, the show has been built up step by step, on free and individual proposals. In order to reduce costs, the collective tried to involve friends and various stakeholders in an exchange of contributions. In a nutshell, a small cooperative making the project work.

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Gianandrea Poletta

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Gianandrea Poletta

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Gianandrea Poletta

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of Gianandrea Poletta

Diego Marcon, presented: “The Nap” and “The Phone Call”, 2014, two triptychs made of vinyl stickers applied on windows, thus creating two big screens activated by natural light, in concomitance with his new publication, a collection of 38 self-contained episodes, entitled: “A Script for Dick”, and published by CuraBooks. Gianandrea Poletta, usually working with iconic products, in “Moonwalk Pro”, 2014, managed to have a sponsorship by Nike, in order to present his rotating Nike Air Huarache, which will be visible again at the upcoming edition of Artissima contemporary art fair. Namsal Siedlecki, for his work: “Gomba Kalap”, 2014, met one of the last old craftsmen producing mushroom leather in Transylvania, a material similar to suede, obtained by the processing of a particular fungus. Siedlecki learned the procedure of making a hunting hat, and the craftman greeted him with enthusiasm in his small house in a forest where they spent three days together, time needed to go through the manufacturing stages. The formula of arrangements with companies and artisans in the production of the works, definitely seems to be a valid and repeatable experiment.

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of the artists and Pinksummer

Photo Andrea Rossetti. Courtesy of the artists and Pinksummer

Alis/Filliol, Luca De Leva, Andrea De Stefani, Helena Hladilová, Invernomuto, Diego Marcon, Giovanni Oberti, Gianandrea Poletta, Namsal Siedlecki + Vittorio Rappa & Daniel Sansavini  

© Jonas Lindström

© Jonas Lindström

Nirvana – Strange Forms of Pleasure is Switzerland’s first international-level exhibition to be devoted to forms of pleasure in contemporary creation, exploring design as well as fashion and contemporary art, and the first compre­hensive study of the influence of erotica on design, contemporary art and fashion. By turns bold, luxurious and mysterious, the exhibi­tion presents works by around eighty artists and designers, and over 200 objects and installations.

© Diego Indraccolo

© Diego Indraccolo

The exhibition features a selection of contemporary designers who draw on the iconography of pleasure in their creative work, finding inspiration in erotic and fetishist literature, along with the images, objects and clothing to which they frequently refer. Visitors will discover finely-crafted, sometimes rare and inaccessible items, made from materials usually associated with the worlds of luxury goods, craftsmanship and contemporary art.

© Mustafa Sabbagh

© Mustafa Sabbagh

The exhibition invites us to examine our own ideas and perceptions of pleasure. It forces us to observe how its forms of expression can cross the line from the private to the public sphere when they are the subject of fashion, design or art. Designers cover the body with close-fitting garments or sensual materials, adorning them with jewellery that is aesthetically as well as erotically pleasing, creating furniture with evocative forms, works of art in which beauty and perfection are spiced with the whiff of brimstone. Nirvana shows that society’s desire for sensual pleasure remains vigorous in our digital age.

© Lara Giliberto

© Lara Giliberto

The exhibition focuses on design, fashion, and also contemporary art, which helps to open our eyes: its aim is to examine our relationship with the forms and objects that give physical expression to our unconscious perceptions of sexuality and our private notions of pleasure. In the exhibits, taboos are subverted by the use of unexpected shapes and materials, and by an attention to detail that has much in common with what the fashion world would consider haute couture.

© Mustafa Sabbagh

© Mustafa Sabbagh

Celebrated and up-and-coming designers alike bring these multiple influences into the spotlight, placing in the public sphere what has hitherto remained private. All these designers force us to question our value judgements on erotic practices by presenting unexpectedly luxurious items, worked to the highest standards of craftsmanship in leather, glass and precious metals.

Mudac

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

This autumn the Royal Academy of Arts will present the first major exhibition of Allen Jones’ work in the UK since 1995. This will be a long-overdue appraisal of Jones’ comprehensive contribution to British Pop art. Allen Jones RA will span the artist’s entire career from the 1960s to the present. Comprising over 80 works, the exhibition will feature examples of Jones’ paintings and sculpture, including the iconic furniture works from the late 60s, and new works created especially for this exhibition. Rarely-seen drawings will also be displayed to showcase Jones’ exceptional skills as a draughtsman, and the important influence of the medium of drawing on his practice as a whole. The female figure has remained an enduring interest for Jones, who has continually found fascination in popular culture’s prolific and differing depictions of femininity, ranging from the erotic to the seductive and the glamorous.

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Allen Jones RA will present examples of portraits of cultural icons, for example a painting of Darcey Bussell and a new work of Kate Moss, reflecting the strong impact of cult images from 1960s America on his work. The exhibition will place a focus on Jones’ sculptural depictions of the female figure, featuring perhaps his most famous and controversial works Hat Stand (1969), Table (1969) and Chair (1969), but also more recent examples, such as Refrigerator (2002) and Light (2002). As a retrospective survey, Allen Jones RA will trace Jones’ development as an artist. The selection of paintings will explore how the early influences of European painting traditions, seen in Bikini Baby (1962) and Hermaphrodite (1963), gave way to the influence of Abstract Expressionism. Jones made frequent and prolonged visits to America where he came to admire the pictorial innovations of his contemporaries Roy Lichtenstein and Tom Wesselmann in New York, and Ed Ruscha and Mel Ramos on the West Coast, with this inspiration clearly visible in First Step (1966).

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

The influences of city life, transport, advertising, music and cinema all provide equally fascinating subject matter for Jones to exploit and explore. For example, 2nd Bus (1962) evokes the energy and movement of people on a mode of transport which was to become a cultural icon for London. Matching Jones’ expansive world view is his ability to work with a wide variety of media, which is very much underpinned by his accomplished skills as a draughtsman. Drawing has played a key role throughout his career, and examples on display will explore the relationship between Jones’ drawings and finished works. Borrowing freely from other forms of expression, Jones frequently employs storyboarding techniques to imbue his work with a cinematic sense of action and atmosphere. The result is a highly developed sense of performance, as seen in Hot Wire (1970) and Three-Part Invention (2002).

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Image courtesy of the artist. © Allen Jones

Allen Jones is a key figure in British Pop art whose reputation was established in the 1960s at the Royal College of Art, London, where he studied alongside celebrated artists David Hockney RA, Derek Boshier, Peter Phillips RA and Ron Kitaj amongst others. This cohort of students was catapulted into the spotlight of the British art scene with a new visual language, firmly rooted in contemporary culture, and with the human figure often central to their work. Allen Jones was elected a Royal Academician in 1986 and his work has been exhibited around the world in both solo and group exhibitions. Jones also designs for stage and television, with productions including Oh Calcutta! (Kenneth Tynan), Männer wir kommen (West Deutsche Rundfunk), Satie/Cinema (Ballet Rambert) and Signed in Red (Royal Ballet, London). Jones lives and works in London and Oxfordshire.

Royal Academy

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York
Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Koenig & Clinton is pleased to announce Huh, Lily van der Stokker’s second solo exhibition with the gallery, in which the artist celebrates defiance and embellishment in both subject and form, with all new works—all pink. At its core, Huh presents a greater discussion about beauty, femininity, and optimism to which the ugly, the cheap, and the vacant are tethered. In the artist’s words, “Huh is about stupidity, paint and the body, the baby, the flesh; about roundness, closeness and softness…it is girly, sweet, decorative, cheap, and about pleasure and color. It is about the ground, the beginning, Zen and nothing, the monochrome.”

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York
Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Huh holds a mirror to art world clichés and power structures, and laughs about them. Affixed to the gallery’s wall, a pink retail sign advertises: only yelling older women in here/nothing to sell. Just opposite, van der Stokker’s vast acrylic wall paintings engulf the main gallery space. Initially inspired by the artist’s own floral-patterned pajama pants, handwritten speech bubbles are adorned with curlicues, puffy clouds, and floral motifs. These charming blob-like texts comment on their own situation in the exhibition: very nice to lie here togetherlovely to be next to youwe are the same.

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York
Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Sculptural objects expand the wall paintings’ reach into three dimensions, while custom-made furniture invokes interior décor, a nod to feminine beautification and domestic coziness. At the center of the gallery, the eponymous freestanding sculpture is covered in doodles, and appears to be spilling over with goopy paint; textual quips such asoopy, ucky, and uffy, puffy seem to ooze out from underneath. Just behind it, a large wooden panel is decorated with flowers and several small shelves, each one cradling a roll of toilet paper. In the lower-left corner, the object’s title: Nothing.

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York
Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Huh plays on the tension between viewers’ assumptions and the reality present in van der Stokker’s expansive pink installation, challenging conventional ideas of girlishness, enthusiasm, and ornament. “The reputation of pink is one of low intellect,” notes van der Stokker. “For me, Nothing and pink represent a comfort zone, a return to the womb, to the mother, to sleep, to the bed; a world without ambition or hierarchy; the ground. Here, pink is a world of pleasure, of goals unreached, a world without urgency or pressure.” Exuberantly striving toward the comfort of decorative flatness, Huh stakes out an antithetical position to ‘bad boy art’, and encourages the viewer to question the anatomy of substance, meaning, and above all, seriousness.

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York
Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York

Lily van der Stokker has exhibited extensively in both Europe and the U.S. In January 2015, van der Stokker’s installation will be on view in the Hammer Museum’s Wilshire Lobby, Los Angeles. Her most recent exhibitions include Sorry, Same Wall Painting at The New Museum, New York; Terrible at the Museum Boijmans, Rotterdam; To The Wall with David Shrigley at the Aspen Art Museum; and Plug In #52 with Jim Iserman at the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum in Eindoven. She is the subject of It Doesn’t Mean Anything, But It Looks Good, published on the occasion of her exhibition No Big Deal Thing at the Tate St. Ives in Cornwall. Van der Stokker has been commissioned to produce numerous public works, including Kalm nou maar…(Don’t Worry), Rotterdam (2013); Celestial Teapot, Utrecht, Netherlands (2013), andThe Pink Building, Hannover (2000). The artist lives and works in New York City and Amsterdam.

Koenig & Clinton

 

The western cultural abuse of type-symbols such as:

! # * (: , @ % ~ / . ` “ $

underlines a lack of genuine thinking in favour of an overloaded mass production of globalized

Hyper-signs > more close to the indiscriminate glazing on doughnuts than a real ECOLOGY of language

WikiLeaks and rainbow gradients:

Gogoși are Romanian sweet pastries similar to doughnuts

shaped into a flattened sphere > deep-fried in oil

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

> optionally > dusted with icing sugar

> filled with chocolate, jam or cream cheese

 They have no hole and are believed to date back to classical antiquity

HTML tags:

< head>

<title>EAST</title>

</head>

<body>

the opposite of west

perpendicular to north and south

 

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

By convention:

the right hand side of a map

the direction toward which

the  Earth rotates about its axis

delimitarea este mobilă

și poate avea în vedere puncte de radicalizare

a limbajului plastic

     un amalgam de reacții și curente dialectale

</body>

*E-W:

 

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

A Symbol,

contrasted with continuous and analog signals,

linguistic information,

input devices of a group of switches pulled at regular intervals

*E-W: W-E: E-W: E-W: W-E: E-W: W-EAST

The *E-Wstern cultural abuse of PROP-Political values:

Geographical algorithms

Economic schedules for web interdependence

Manufactured critical masses

 

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Classifications > involved in the delivery of limited industrial outputs

Tweet seed: The Information Age

a knowledge-based society surrounded by a high-tech global economy, with precise personalized needs, focused and enforced by the State, under social and cultural trends, beyond the glaze of HIP-Industrial Revolutions

Pollution and unsolicited low-value information:

> PUBLIC CUSTOMED PEEPBUZZ

The premise of art

Aesthetic Growth, attention-grabbing patterns,

Objects on landscapes and financial transactions on

 

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

Courtesy of Stefano Calligaro

retailers – who offer corporate aesthetic in order to

costumize human hands in creatures of suggestion -

> businessdictionary

literally > ethics and billions of mobile ads

a unique model for teaching primary principles of

BILINGUAL infomercial display

STICKERS on apples in supermarkets

Herbal Essences

music in the background and a silhouette listening:

For instance the brochures have a beautiful design,

they have no hole and are believed to date back to classical antiquity

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